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NFC Post-Draft Rookie Breakdown

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NFC Post-Draft Rookie Breakdown

Fantasy football is an information game. Which players are the most talented? Who’s in line for increased volume? Who’s going to see significant Week 1 snaps?

Information on incoming rookies is inarguably the toughest to find. My goal with this piece is to aggregate every meaningful nugget of fantasy rookie data I can to make it as easy as possible for both casual and experienced fantasy players to climb the information mountain that is the 2021 rookie class. Let’s break it down by team.

NFC EAST

Dallas Cowboys

Round 5, Pick 35: Simi Fehoko, WR, Stanford

Week 1 Projection: Third-String WR

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 61 (WR30)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

Simi Fehoko may be the most perplexing WR in the entire 2021 class. He stands at 6’4”, 222 pounds and has one of the best athletic profiles of any WR, as Scott Barrett notes “his 115.3 Speed Score ranks behind only D.K. Metcalf (129.7), Chase Claypool (124.7), and Jazz Ferguson (115.8) since 2016”. He’s also one of the older WRs in the 2020 class at 23.4. Incredibly, he recorded 59 receptions, 1,644 yards, and 24 TDs during his junior season in high school at the ridiculous age of 14. Now that’s a breakout age.

So what’s the issue? He’s about as raw of a WR as you will see get drafted. He ran an incredibly limited route tree in both high school and college, per Wes Huber’s dynasty draft profile. He struggled massively in the slot, recording 1.85 YPRR from that alignment. He caught just 62 passes in his entire college career. Huber opined Fehoko becoming a situational deep-threat was “the best case scenario,” and even suggested he could benefit from a move to TE. Winding up on the Cowboy’s loaded WR group makes immediate playing time impossible, and future snaps very questionable. The tough thing about Fehoko is that it seems everyone has a different opinion on him (positive and negative), making his overall outlook murky. He’s a high-risk, middling-reward dynasty addition with zero value in all other league types.

New York Giants

Round 1, Pick 20: Kadarius Toney, WR, Florida

Week 1 Projection: Fringe Starter

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: 180 (WR74)

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 7 (WR4)

BestBall10s ADP: 226.35 (WR79)

Underdog ADP: 179.1 (WR76)

A QB in high school, Kadarius Toney didn’t see a legit starting WR workload until his senior season in college, and what he did as a slot WR that season had NFL teams gushing over what he could be at next level. Wes Huber acknowledged Toney looked tremendously raw as a route-runner early on, but has always had elite play-making ability when running with the football. By his final season at Florida, Wes writes that “his senior film blew me away. It’s truly a different player. He’s always had an elite skillset with the ball in his hands. But I was not expecting to see the crispness of his route running so quickly”. PFF’s Mike Renner comped Toney to “The Human Joystick,” Dante Hall. Greg Cosellmentioned Toney reminded him of Randall Cobb, but with significantly more explosion and straight-line speed. He recorded a near-elite 88.8 SPORQ score. He’s an amazing playmaker who is right on the cusp of being a great all-around slot WR.

Unfortunately, Sterling Shepard’s presence on the roster will prevent Toney from seeing a starter-esque allocation of slot snaps. It is worth noting, however, that Shepard could be a post-June 1st cut, as that would save NYG nearly $3 million. If Shepard is cut, I would aggressively take Toney by WR50 in every best ball and redraft league I participate in. If not, Toney should see still the touches needed this season to make him worthwhile (at cost) in best best ball and redraft, but regardless, he’s a lights-out top-8 dynasty selection.

Round 6, Pick 12: Gary Brightwell, RB, Arizona

Week 1 Projection: Practice Squad RB

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 80 (RB22)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

A bruising, 220-pound, between-the-tackles back, Gary Brightwell’s only hope of NFL playing time is in a short-yardage/goal line role. He’s a poor athlete who brings nothing to the receiving game as a blocker or receiver, logging 18.0 and 37.6 PFF grades in pass protection his final two seasons, recording five drops on 23 career catchable targets, and never earning a PFF receiving grade higher than 62.0. His 3.59 YCO/A (in 2020) and 60 missed tackles forced on 242 career carries do offer some reasons for optimism, but when you are that bad in the passing game NFL snaps will be few and far between. I’d only consider Brightwell in the deepest of zero-PPR dynasty leagues.

Philadelphia Eagles

Round 1, Pick 10: DeVonta Smith, WR, Alabama

Week 1 Projection: Immediate Starter

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: 80 (WR38)

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 6 (WR3)

BestBall10s ADP: 152.13 (WR44)

Underdog ADP: 80.8 (WR37)

DeVonta Smith’s 2020 season was arguably the greatest ever by a college WR, and certainly the best from the last 20 years. Smith’s 2020 campaign ranked 2nd in both receiving yards (1,856) and TDs (23) of any WR since 2000. He averaged 36.7 FPG in his final nine games (without Jaylen Waddle). His 4.39 YPRR is the best by a power-5 WR since at least 2014. He earned PFF’s highest grade ever awarded to a WR (96.4) since they began college grading in 2014. Over his final three college seasons, he’s averaged a 154.0 passer rating when targeted. A perfect passer rating is 158.3. He’s dropped just nine passes on 306 career targets. He’s one of the greatest college receivers ever.

There are only two gripes brought up by NFL scouts over Smith’s ability to translate his skills to the next level: his weight and his breakout age. The breakout age is a bit ridiculous given he played on a college team with three other first-round-caliber WRs and still put up almost 700 receiving yards as a 19-year-old sophomore and 1,256 as a 20-year-old junior. The weight is a different story.

Since 2000, no WR with a BMI under 24.0 has ever recorded a 1,000-yard season in the NFL. The hit rate for 1,000-yard seasons from WRs with a BMI under 26.0 is nearly 20% lower than the hit rate for WRs larger than 26.0. Both our own Greg Cosell and PFF’s Mike Renner noted DeVonta was often bodied and squeezed to the sideline by larger college corners. That won’t slow down in the NFL. It was cause for enough concern that he fell to WR3 in the NFL draft.

I’m not worried though. Why? He gained nearly 20 pounds in college and will likely gain some weight in the NFL. He’s the only WR with a BMI under 25.0 to win the Heisman. He’s the fourth WR ever to win the award. He’s the 2nd WR since 2000 with a BMI under 24.0 to even get drafted. Just look at some of the stats and metrics mentioned above — he’s clearly an extreme outlier. I love chasing unicorns in fantasy football, and Smith fits that description perfectly. Given the weakness of the Eagles’ receiving corps, he’s going to start immediately. I was optimistic Smith would be their slot man this year, as he was even more efficient from that alignment in college, but it looks like he’s going to be on the outside. Regardless, the immediate starting role makes him the clear rookie WR2 in best ball and redraft, and no worse than WR3 in dynasty.

Round 5, Pick 6: Kenneth Gainwell, RB, Memphis

Week 1 Projection: Third String RB

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: 172 (RB58)

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 28 (RB8)

BestBall10s ADP: 165.75 (RB40)

Underdog ADP: 183.3 (RB54)

Kenneth Gainwell opted out in 2020 and only saw 10 touches as a true freshman in 2018, so we only have 1 full season of production from his redshirt freshman season in 2019 to base our evaluation on. His production in that single season was outstanding, though. Scott Barrett perfectly summarizes it in his rookie RB model breakdown, writing “In 2019, Gainwell totaled 1,459 rushing yards on 231 carries (6.3 YPC) and 610 receiving yards on 59 targets. He averaged 104.2 rushing YPG and 43.6 receiving YPG, becoming one of just 15 RBs since 2006 to reach 95.0 rushing YPG and 40.0 receiving YPG in a single season. On that list, you’ll find names like Christian McCaffrey, Saquon Barkley, Matt Forte, Todd Gurley, Chris Johnson, and Joe Mixon, but Gainwell is the only player to have accomplished this feat as a freshman.” It’s also worth noting that both Greg Cosell and PFF’s Mike Renner (among others) loved Gainwell’s receiving ability, as an impressive 48% of his 610 receiving yards came lined up in the slot or out wide. He’s an elite receiving talent at RB.

The landing spot is a bit tricky, as Miles Sanders (UFA in 2023), Kerryon Johnson (UFA in 2022), and Boston Scott’s (RFA in 2022) combined presence will make rookie snaps for Gainwell difficult to come by barring any injury. For that reason, I won’t have a ton of him in best ball or redraft but I’m extremely bullish on Gainwell in PPR dynasty formats.

Washington Football Team

Round 3, Pick 19: Dyami Brown, WR, North Carolina

Week 1 Projection: Fringe Starter

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 19 (WR10)

BestBall10s ADP: 238.9 (WR93)

Underdog ADP: 184.0 (WR78)

Dyami Brown and his absurd 17.1 career college aDOT will add a new vertical dimension to an offense that should see a drastic rise in its target depth after moving on from the way-too-conservative Alex Smith to the gunslingin’ Ryan Fitzpatrick. Brown basically never played the slot in college (51 career slot snaps) so he’ll be primarily competing with Cam Sims on the outside for immediate playing time. He’s not the elite athlete (49.5 SPORQ) we like to see from players who are primarily vertical threats, but his production (back-to-back 1,000+ receiving seasons as a true sophomore/junior) and efficiency (6th best YPRR in 2020) both suggest good news for his NFL prospects. His 2021 snap outlook varies massively depending on whom you ask, he could essentially start on the outside and approach 80 targets or he could see a meager 20% snap share and offer minimal fantasy value. That’s a huge range, but the upside of high-aDOT WRs almost always outweighs the downside, even if the downside is not seeing the field. I’m treating Brown as a top-value (at cost) high-upside WR in best ball, a solid bench addition in redraft, and a clear-cut top-12 WR in rookie drafts.

Round 4, Pick 19: John Bates, TE, Boise State

Week 1 Projection: Second-String WR

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 88 (TE9)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

At 6’5”, 250, John Bates is the prototypical body type of an NFL TE. The biggest sign of encouragement for his career at the next level is his incredibly consistent improvement throughout college. His PFF run and pass blocking grades improved every year, as did his YPRR, going from 0.92 in 2018 to 1.83 by 2020. He’s a decent athlete (albeit a slow one with a 4.9 forty) who recorded the 22nd-best weight-adjusted three-cone by a TE since 2000. If he can continue to improve his game as he did in college, Bates could eventually find himself a starting job in what’s arguably the thinnest position group in the NFL. For 2021, however, he’s nothing more than a long term dynasty stash.

Round 7, Pick 31: Dax Milne, WR, BYU

Week 1 Projection: Third-String WR

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 72 (WR36)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

BYU’s ‘other’ 2020 breakout player, Dax Milne went from 21 receptions and 285 yards in 2019 to 70 receptions and 1,188 yards this past season. Interestingly, he also went from playing the majority of his snaps in the slot in 2019 to playing on the outside over 75% of the time in 2020. Greg Cosell raved about Milne’s “desirable combination of refined and nuanced route running.” He wasn’t the only one, every scouting report I came across mentioned route running as a top strength of his, which certainly bodes well for his NFL prospects. He isn’t a great athlete but did have solid college efficiency with 3.75 YPRR and an 89.6 PFF receiving grade (granted, that did come against poor competition). There are a decent amount of teams where I think Milne could make the 53-man roster as a rookie. Washington, with strong depth on the second and third string at WR, unfortunately, isn’t one of them. I’m also skeptical of his overall ceiling given the athletic profile, so I’d avoid adding him in any league type until we actually see him active on Sundays.

Undrafted: Jaret Patterson, RB, Buffalo

Week 1 Projection: Third-String RB

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 82 (RB23)

BestBall10s ADP: 239.14 (RB78)

Underdog ADP: 216.0 (RB97)

The only undrafted player worth discussing in this guide, what Jaret Patterson did in his three seasons at Buffalo was truly astonishing. Scott Barrett touches on just how impressive Patterson’s volume numbers were, saying, “In 2020, he totaled 1,072 yards (7.6 YPC) and 19 touchdowns on 141 carries (no receptions), including a two-game stretch where he totaled 710 yards and 12 touchdowns on 67 carries. His 178.7 rushing YPG average in 2020 ranks sixth-best since 2000, on a top-10 list that includes LaDainian Tomlinson, Melvin Gordon, DeAngelo Williams, and Matt Forte. And he wasn’t just a one-hit wonder – in 2019, he totaled 20 touchdowns, 1,799 rushing yards, and 209 receiving yards on 325 touches.” His 17.0 Y/REC from 2019 suggest to me he still has room to grow as a receiver, and he also ranked highly in both missed tackles forced and yards after contact in all of his college seasons.

Unfortunately, his size (5’9”, 195) and very poor athletic profile (11.1 SPORQ) ended up pushing him off draft boards, but college production like Patterson’s is just too good to ignore completely. I’m not taking Patterson in any redraft or best ball leagues, but with only Peyton Barber standing between him and a 53-man roster spot, it would be foolish to overlook the 21-year-old rusher in dynasty.

NFC NORTH

Chicago Bears

Round 1, Pick 11: Justin Fields, QB, Ohio State

Week 1 Projection: Backup QB

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: 155 (QB20)

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 13 (QB2)

BestBall10s ADP: 195.6 (QB24)

Underdog ADP: 127.6 (QB16)

With two years of high-end college play and great athletic testing, Justin Fields became one of the most confounding prospects of the NFL Draft. Not because of what he did on or off the football field, but because he was subjected to one of the weirdest pre-draft, negativity-driven media barrages I’ve ever seen. Whether this was a Laremy Tunsil-esque psyop remains to be known, but it still warrants mention nonetheless.

As a QB at OSU, Fields shined. He posted the 2nd-best adjusted completion percentage in 2020 at 80.8% and was PFF’s selection for the most accurate QB in the draft class, per their accuracy charting. He recorded 10.2 rushing FPG in 2020 and 9.2 in 2019. Our own Wes Huber loved Fields enough to rank him as his dynasty QB2, and I tend to agree. That kind of passing talent and Konami Code upside makes Fields incredibly exciting from a fantasy perspective. My only concern is that he won’t start come Week 1, and that’s enough of a problem in my opinion to warrant selecting Zach Wilson (who is a lock to start in Week 1) ahead of Fields in both redraft and best ball leagues for 2021. Especially in best ball, those who draft Fields must take three total QBs to hedge against the possibility of a mid/late-season rookie debut. In any case, Fields remains second to only Trey Lance as my favorite high-upside dynasty rookie QB option (no worse than dyno QB3) and should be an excellent resource in DFS once he earns the starting job.

Round 6, Pick 33: Khalil Herbert, RB, Virginia Tech

Week 1 Projection: Practice Squad RB

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 36 (RB12)

BestBall10s ADP: 239.85 (RB84)

Underdog ADP: 216.0 (RB92)

One of the late-bloomers of the 2021 RB class, Khalil Herbert crushed in his final season as a Virginia Tech Hokie. Of the 95 FBS RBs with at least 100 rushes in 2020, Herbert was 5th in PFF rushing grade, t-1st in YCO/A, and 15th in missed tackles forced. Athletically, he’s roughly middle of the pack, and he is on the older side of RB prospects at 23 years old. He ranked 8th in Scott Barrett’s rookie RB model, but unfortunately, likely won’t contribute much to the receiving game in the NFL, as he caught just 10 passes in his career-best 2020 season (though he did convert those receptions into an impressive 17.9 Y/REC). Given the current state of Chicago’s RB depth chart, Herbert won’t play much, if at all in 2021, so it’s best to lay off in non-dynasty formats for now. Even so, Damien Williams’ likely departure in 2022 should open the door to a rotational role and could make Herbert an intriguing handcuff in his sophomore season.

Round 6, Pick 37: Dazz Newsome, WR, North Carolina

Week 1 Projection: Third-String WR

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 67 (WR34)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

Dazz Newsome is a career slot (just 29 career snaps out wide) with a very concerning athletic profile (28.1 SPORQ). Newsome’s college efficiency wasn’t anything to get excited about either, as his 1.89 YPRR from the slot ranked 47th among power-5 WRs with at least 20 slot targets. It’s not all bad, though, as he was spoken highly of by Greg Cosell in the Fantasy Points draft guide. This was Cosell’s bottom line in regards to Newsome’s NFL transition: “Overall I liked Newsome's game and I believe he can be an effective slot receiver with his natural route and separation quickness.” Cosell did also note that Newsome’s slot-only status will likely hurt his ability to see snaps in an NFL that’s quickly favoring WRs who can perform from any alignment. To be condemned to the slot at the next level with poor athletic testing and middling college efficiency is cause for massive concern. I don’t foresee any playing time for Newsome this season, and I’m skeptical of his ability to ever make a 53-man roster, especially a deep one at WR like Chicago.

Detroit Lions

Round 4, Pick 7: Amon-Ra St. Brown, WR, USC

Week 1 Projection: Fringe Starter

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: 215 (WR84)

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 18 (WR9)

BestBall10s ADP: 234.15 (WR85)

Underdog ADP: 168.3 (WR71)

At just 21.6 years old, Amon-Ra St. Brown is one of the youngest WRs in the 2021 class and he presents a near-elite 91st percentile breakout age of just 18.9. He worked primarily from the slot in both his true freshman and sophomore seasons, before eventually seeing a 64.5% snap share out wide his junior year. Neither his athletic testing nor his college receiving efficiency jump off the page, but St. Brown is one of Wes Huber’s favorite players in this class, and that’s something I put a lot of weight in. Huber’s glowing overview of St. Brown’s game plus an excellent breakout age makes me think he’ll wind up seeing starter-caliber snaps in the NFL sooner than later. Let’s talk landing spot.

After losing an absurd 58% of their 2020 targets to free agency, the Detroit Lions are far and away the NFL team most in need of depth at the WR position. With perennial deep-threats Tyrell Williams and Breshad Perriman plus Mr. Down Bad Quintez Cephus as his primary receiving competition, I’d expect St. Brown and his much-needed versatility to see somewhere around a 50% snap share come Week 1, before eventually becoming a full-time starter and serious contributor by midseason. It is important to remember that Detroit projects as a bottom-5 offense this season, so even a likely starting role doesn’t necessarily translate to guaranteed fantasy success. Regardless, the Lions need bodies out there to catch passes, and St. Brown will immediately benefit as a result.

Round 7, Pick 30: Jermar Jefferson, RB, Oregon State

Week 1 Projection: Third-String RB

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 44 (RB15)

BestBall10s ADP: 217.85 (RB59)

Underdog ADP: N/A

Similar to his teammate (listed above), Jermar Jefferson is both one of the youngest players (21.1) at his respective position in the class and offers an elite breakout age. Scott Barrett noted that: “as an 18-year-old true freshman in 2018, Jefferson totaled 1,380 rushing yards and 147 receiving yards on 239 carries and 25 catches. This represented 31% of his team’s total YFS, an elite number for any RB, let alone an 18-year-old true freshman. Adjusting for games missed, that number jumped to 38% in 2020, when he averaged 154.2 YFS per game, which ranked best in the class among the Power-5 RBs.” That’s exactly what we look for from a fantasy perspective, but as impressive as that is, Jefferson still presents some red flags.

For starters, his athletic testing was not what you want to see. A 32.2 SPORQ score won’t turn any heads. Despite solid hands (1 drop on 44 career catchable targets) he never recorded a PFF receiving grade greater than 68.8, and given his athletic numbers, it’s clear he would be limited as a route-runner in the NFL, at least initially. These issues, coupled with the elite breakout age, make me think Jefferson’s ceiling is in an RBBC role with middling involvement in the passing game. Joining a Detroit RB room that already has D’Andre Swift, Jamaal Williams, and could add Todd Gurley means rookie year playing time for Jefferson is likely nonexistent. He is, however, still a worthwhile developmental dynasty stash for a chance at further improvement from the young, talented rusher.

Green Bay Packers

Round 3, Pick 22: Amari Rodgers, WR, Clemson

Week 1 Projection: Fringe Starter

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: 229 (WR90)

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 27 (WR14)

BestBall10s ADP: 239.34 (WR96)

Underdog ADP: 190.6 (WR80)

At 5’9”, 212 pounds, Amari Rodgers’ body type likely pigeonholes him as “slot only” at the next level. He’s been a contributor for Clemson since his true freshman season but truly stepped into a WR1-type role as a senior, setting career-high marks in yardage (1,020), TDs (7), and receptions (77) while also earning career marks in crucial efficiency and volume stats like YPRR (2.61) and team target share (20.8%). It is worth noting that 28% of Rodgers’ 2020 receiving yards came on screens, which is both a class-leading number and a red flag.

Desperate for a “true” slot WR, Green Bay traded the 135th pick to move up seven spots to grab Rodgers. GM Brian Gutenkust suggested the club has a Randall Cobb-esque role in mind for Rodgers, saying: “He fills so many holes for us. That's one of the reasons why we traded up for him was because not only as a punt returner and a slot receiver, but as you guys have seen over the past couple years the creativity that [HC] Matt [LaFleur] has within his offense, some of the jet sweeps and screens." I’d love Rodgers (at cost) in PPR formats if we knew Aaron Rodgers would be his QB for the foreseeable future. It doesn’t look like that’s the case, unfortunately, so I’m keeping my Amari Rodgers exposure relatively low across the board until we get more QB clarity.

Round 7, Pick 29: Kylin Hill, RB, Mississippi State

Week 1 Projection: Third-String RB

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 37 (RB13)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

Described by Greg Cosell as a “downhill, inside power back who ran with

determination and competitiveness,” Kylin Hill brought consistent production to the Bulldogs’ offense for all four of his seasons with the team. He’s a solid athlete who also managed to contribute as a receiver, recording 1.52 yards per route run on 67 career receptions. Hill doesn’t offer many elite traits, but just as crucially, lacks significant red flags. He’ll be the clear RB3 in GB this season, but given their substantial investments in both Aaron Jones and A.J. Dillion, he won’t play much (if at all), and thus, isn’t worth a draft selection in anything but dynasty.

Minnesota Vikings

Round 3, Pick 2: Kellen Mond, QB, Texas A&M

Week 1 Projection: Second-String QB

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 48 (QB6)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

Clearly drafted as a developmental backup to Kirk Cousins (UFA in 2023), Kellen Mond is quite interesting from a dynasty perspective. Encouragingly, Mond’s best season came in his last, where he logged a career-best 103.9 passer rating, 7.7 YPA, and 81.3 PFF passing grade. His breakout age of 19.2 lands in the 87th percentile, which is another good sign. He consistently added a rushing dimension to A&M’s offense, recording 438 career carries (5.7 YPC) and 22 TDs. Mond’s largest issue appears to be his accuracy, which nearly every significant talent evaluator noted as a major weakness. Greg Cosell also pointed out another key concern for Mond, saying he “has the look and feel of a schemed QB who needs the pass game structure work for him in defining the reads and throws.”

With at least one, and likely two seasons to get comfortable with an NFL playbook, Mond can potentially grow out of his “schemed” nature into hopefully a more well-rounded, read and react QB. The accuracy issues are legitimately concerning, though. With the crucial exception of Josh Allen, it’s exceedingly rare for a QB to drastically improve his accuracy at any stage of his career. The good news is that Mond’s rushing ability helps compensate and means he doesn’t have to be especially accurate, but he will likely need to improve in that element to ever become a legitimate starter. Overall, Mond’s draft position, rushing ability, breakout age, and near-lifetime of college QB experience make him the dynasty QB6, but he will need to continue his development to become a viable fantasy contributor.

Round 4, Pick 14: Kene Nwangwu, RB, Iowa State

Week 1 Projection: Practice Squad RB

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 39 (RB14)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

Kene Nwangwu offers an elite combination of size (6’1”, 210) and athleticism with the 13th best RB SPORQ score and t-2nd fastest forty since 2000. His college production, though, certainly leaves some questions as to what exactly he will be at the next level. Nwangwu was never Iowa State’s lead rusher, seeing no more than 61 rushes in any of his four college seasons. He was also a complete non-factor in the receiving game with just 7 career catches, a concerning surprise given the outstanding athletic testing. Ameer Abdullah (UFA in 2022) will prevent Nwangwu from seeing the field as a receiving option, while Alexander Mattison (UFA in 2023) and Dalvin Cook (UFA in 2026) block any obvious path to carries. Nwangnu is unfortunately in a similar position to now-Bronco Mike Boone, and given the youth (and contracts) of incumbents Mattison and Cook, may never be more than a spell back for at least the next two seasons.

Round 5, Pick 13: Ihmir Smith-Marsette, WR, Iowa

Week 1 Projection: Second-String WR

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 54 (WR26)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: 215.8 (WR120)

Primarily an outside WR at Iowa, Ihmir Smith-Marsette’s 181-pound frame (and Greg Cosell’s own pre-draft analysis) suggest he’ll be best served by a move to the slot unless he can add more weight at the next level. He offers elite burst (100th percentile 10-yard split) and solid overall athleticism, but lacked the college efficiency numbers we typically like to see, never recording a YPRR higher than 2.12. He’s likely to see usage primarily as a gadget player and kick returner, with the potential of some deeper routes if he can continue to develop as a WR. Playing time will be a massive question mark in Minnesota, as the Vikings ran out the fewest personnel groupings utilizing three WRs in the NFL last year. With Chad Beebe set to be a UFA in 2022, Smith-Marsette will have a shot to claim the slot job next year, granted it’s arguably the least valuable one in the NFL. Unless we see a coaching change, Smith-Marsette just won’t earn the snaps needed to be a productive fantasy asset in any format. He’s no more than a depth dynasty stash.

Round 5, Pick 24: Zach Davidson, TE, Central Missouri

Week 1 Projection: Backup? Maybe?

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 89 (TE11)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

Coming from DII’s Central Missouri means there just isn’t the same amount of data and film to judge Zach Davidson’s college to NFL transition like the other prospects listed. He’s 6’7”, 245, and per Lance Zierlein “offer[s] a desired combination of speed and athleticism to work all three levels of the field with a natural advantage in the catch-radius department.” He recorded an impressive 894 receiving yards and 15 TDs in 2019. He was also Central Missouri’s punter (biggest punter ever?), and a pretty good one at that, averaging over 40.0 yards per punt every season. His size and college production explain the fifth-round pedigree, but we don’t have any athletic testing data and it’s fair to assume he was absolutely beating up on his smaller DII opponents, which just isn’t going to be possible at the NFL level. He’s as developmental as any prospect could ever be and is thus only worth consideration to dynasty owners comfortable stashing him for multiple seasons.

NFC SOUTH

Atlanta Falcons

Round 1, Pick 4: Kyle Pitts, TE, Florida

Week 1 Projection: Immediate Starter

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: 69 (nice) (TE7)

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 2 (TE1)

BestBall10s ADP: 134.13 (TE10)

Underdog ADP: 62.3 (TE5)

TE prospect of the century. Kyle Pitts stands 6’6”, 245, and ran a 4.40 forty with a 129” broad jump. Per PFF, he recorded an absurd 4.91 YPRR vs man coverage in 2020, which ranked third in the country overall and first among TEs by 2 full yards. Among college players who saw at least 50 targets last year, Pitts’ PFF receiving grade (96.1) ranked 1st, his 146.2 passer rating when targeted ranked 4th, and his 3.28 YPRR ranked 12th. He would have been a first-round pick at WR.

Scott Barrett’s rookie model loved Pitts, as he wrote “Pitts is the best TE prospect to come out since at least 2014, and maybe the best TE prospect ever. From an athletic standpoint, only Vernon Davis ranks higher by SPORQ (of 375 qualifiers since 2000).” Greg Cosell noted, “Overall, Pitts does not have a truly defined weakness given what he is and how that transitions to the NFL” which is arguably the greatest nod of approval he could give any player.

Pitts is an immediate starter who should exceed 100 targets (goodbye Julio) his first season. Worst case, you are looking at a mid-to-low-end TE1, and best case he is Travis Kelce by his sophomore year. It’s #PittsSZN

Round 6, Pick 3: Frank Darby, WR, Arizona State

Week 1 Projection: Third-String WR

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 74 (WR37)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

A freaky athlete who averaged 19.7 yards per reception in his ASU career, Frank Darby profiles as little more than a deep-threat WR, at least initially. Greg Cosell noted two major flaws in Darby’s game: inconsistent hands and limited route-running ability. Those are difficult problems to overcome at the NFL level, but his athletic gifts combined with quality coaching could lead to Darby eventually carving himself a spot on a 53-man roster. Trapped on a depth-riddled Atlanta WR corps, Darby is only considerable in deeper than deep dynasty leagues.

Carolina Panthers

Round 2, Pick 37: Terrace Marshall Jr., WR, LSU

Week 1 Projection: Fringe Starter

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: 223 (WR86)

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 16 (WR7)

BestBall10s ADP: 215.22 (WR71)

Underdog ADP: 151.7 (WR65)

Terrace Marshall has all the physical (6’3”, 205) and athletic (4.38 forty) gifts you look for in a dominant NFL WR. His SPORQ score is near-elite (90.2), and he’s just 20.8 years old, which ties Rondale Moore for the second-youngest WR in the class. In a Carolina offense constantly moving around their receivers, Marshall’s familiarity with OC Joe Brady and his ability to play both outside and in the slot (which he demonstrated in spades at LSU) will be tremendously valuable. I’d expect Marshall to initially split time as Carolina’s WR3 with David Moore, before eventually usurping Moore by (hopefully) the middle of the year. After the playing time question is answered, the final major hurdle for Marshall will be QB play, as it’s nearly impossible to know what to expect from the historically neurotic passer Sam Darnold in a much better situation than New York.

Round 4, Pick 21: Chuba Hubbard, RB, Oklahoma State

Week 1 Projection: Second-String RB

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: 213 (RB68)

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 25 (RB7)

BestBall10s ADP: 177.0 (RB44)

Underdog ADP: 179.7 (RB53)

Chuba Hubbard is an interesting prospect who is arguably one of the only players that could have benefitted from opting out in 2020. Scott Barrett’s rookie RB model severely punished Hubbard for his decision to play in 2020, dropping him from RB3 (if he hadn’t played in 2020) to RB9. Hubbard’s 2019 is a season for the history books, as only Hubbard, Jonathan Taylor, and Christian McCaffrey have managed to rush for 2,000+ yards as underclassmen since 2000. In 2020, however, his YPC went from 6.4 to 4.7, his YCO/A went from 3.96 to 2.5, and his missed tackles forced per attempt fell from 0.24 to 0.17.

Greg Cosell expands on the difference in Hubbard’s 2019 and 2020, saying “In 2019, Hubbard showed naturally quick feet and home-run hitting explosiveness, but those traits were missing on his 2020 tape… I liked Hubbard's 2019 tape, but really struggled with his 2020 tape and am not sure what he is in the NFL. He has a lean frame not presently suited to be a foundation back and lacked the needed big-play juice in 2020 to be an explosive back.”

I have a very hard time figuring out what to make of Hubbard as a prospect. He’s got a massive red flag with the efficiency and production drop-offs, but he’s shown he can be a productive college rusher on serious volume. Playing behind CMC won’t lead to much (if any) early playing time, but for dynasty, he might be the optimal high-risk, high-reward RB pick later in rookie drafts.

Round 6, Pick 20: Shi Smith, WR, South Carolina

Week 1 Projection: Second-String WR

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 41 (WR20)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

A slot-first WR at South Carolina, Shi Smith profiles as exactly that in the NFL given his size (5’9”, 186) and athleticism (4.43 forty and 6.83 three-cone). Greg Cosell notes Smith’s hands, route running, ability to separate vs man, and ability to find holes in zones are all strong, which should make for an easier NFL transition. PFF’s Mike Renner did point out that Smith struggles with contact in a variety of ways, whether in contested catch situations (only caught 9/31 contested balls over the last two seasons) or in his overall ability to play through contact, which is something he will likely continue to struggle with at his size. Joe Brady also seems to have a fondness for WRs who can play both outside and in the slot, and Smith just doesn’t offer that. I’m doubtful he sees the field much at all as a rookie, but he’s worth a shot in dynasty if he ever manages to develop into a starting-caliber slot.

New Orleans Saints

Round 4, Pick 28: Ian Book, QB, Notre Dame

Week 1 Projection: Third-String QB

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 71 (QB10)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

Sorting through the scouting reports on Ian Book, it was fairly impressive how many talent evaluators (including our own Greg Cosell and PFF’s Mike Renner) liked his college game, but admitted he simply did not have many skills that translate to the NFL. Cosell notes his poor arm strength, one-read nature, and lack of aggression as a passer all spell trouble at the next level. Book is a solid athlete who tended to be more comfortable on the move than in the pocket with a 4.65 forty and 6.99 three-cone, but given the issues already mentioned, he’s no more than a developmental QB who could just as easily be out of the league in three years as he could be a potential starter or backup QB.

Round 7, Pick 28: Kawaan Baker, WR, South Alabama

Week 1 Projection: Third-String WR

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 50 (WR24)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

Earning 91 career rushing attempts and 127 receptions, Kawaan Baker did it all for South Alabama, playing outside, in the slot, returning kicks and even seeing some backfield snaps. His 4.43 forty and 39.5” vertical leap demonstrate elite athleticism, but his 7.42 three-cone (and the scouting reports) certainly cast doubt on his change of direction and ability to separate consistently in the NFL. Baker’s physical tools and positional versatility make it quite likely he could see serious playing time if he can put it all together. Coming from South Alabama to the NFL makes that “if” a fairly substantial one, though. For that reason, he’s no more than a dynasty flier in 2021.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Round 2, Pick 32: Kyle Trask, QB, Florida

Week 1 Projection: Third-String QB

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 58 (QB7)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

With good size (6’5”, 236) and an abysmal forty-time (5.10), Kyle Trask is the definition of a pocket passer. The big thing that jumps out immediately is just how much Trask improved from 2019 (his first year as a college starter) to 2020. His PFF grade went from 69.9 in 2019 to 92.2 in 2020, his YPA went from 8.3 to 9.8, his aDOT went from 8.6 to 10.1, and his passer rating went from 107.5 to 125.2. Greg Cosell notes a potential reason for this improvement in the draft guide, writing, “One area in which Trask improved significantly from his 2019 tape is his balance delivering the ball. He was a front-foot thrower in 2019, and his 2020 tape showed better balance with a firmer base delivering the ball.”

The NFL’s Lance Zierlein, PFF’s Mike Renner, and our own Greg Cosell all noted that Trask largely lacks the elite traits that we typically see in NFL QBs: elite arm strength, ability to extend plays, and great accuracy. He also struggled in Florida’s bowl game his senior season without the help of 1st-round talents Kyle Pitts and Kadarius Toney. That doesn’t bode well for his chances to ever start an NFL game, but his junior-to-senior year improvement suggests to me he still has room to develop. And boy, did he land in an ideal developmental situation. Trask will be given at least one full season to learn from the best to ever do it, and may not end up starting a game until 2023, or even later depending on how long the Human Fountain of Youth (aka Tom Brady) chooses to play. Trask obviously won’t play this year, but he would immediately become a valuable fantasy commodity if he ever takes over starting duties in the highest-aDOT offense in the league.

Round 4, Pick 24: Jaelon Darden, WR, North Texas

Week 1 Projection: Second-String WR and Potential PR/KR

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 40 (WR19)

BestBall10s ADP: 240.97 (WR135)

Underdog ADP: N/A

Likely to be exclusive to the slot at the next level, the 5’8”, 174-pound Jaelon Darden is one of the most intriguing WRs in this class. A 2020 First-Team All-American selection, Darden finished his UNT career as the school’s all-time leader in receptions (230), receiving yards (2,782), and TDs (38). His 3.91 YPRR from the slot in 2020 ranked 3rd among WRs with at least 25 slot targets, while his 16 slot TDs ranked 1st. He was also a YAC nightmare for opposing defenses, demonstrated by his 23 missed tackles forced on receptions, which led the country in 2020. His 6.66 three-cone is elite for WRs, but his overall athletic profile is a bit concerning, as Scott Barrettnotes Darden’s 18.3 SPORQ score is a massive red flag.

Darden is a very difficult projection. His college production and efficiency was incredible, but the level of competition wasn’t great and his athletic profile is concerning from a SPORQ perspective but not nearly as much from a raw-pro-day-numbers one. Tampa Bay liked him enough to trade up to grab him, he’s performed great thus far in OTAs, and the added potential of kick and punt returns could lead to Darden being active on game days ahead of second-year WR Tyler Johnson who will also be competing with Darden for both second-team slot snaps and KR duties. Playing on a stacked receiving core makes it almost impossible Darden exceeds a 20% snap share in 2021 (making his redraft value borderline nonexistent), but he should still see the field, and could absolutely emerge as fundamental piece of the Buc’s offense if Chris Godwin (UFA in 2022) parts ways with the team.

NFC WEST

Arizona Cardinals

Round 2, Pick 17: Rondale Moore, WR, Purdue

Week 1 Projection: Fringe Starter

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: 150 (WR64)

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 17 (WR8)

BestBall10s ADP: 198.15 (WR65)

Underdog ADP: 140.9 (WR61)

The breakout age to end all breakout ages. Just two months after turning 18, {{Rondale Moore|WR|ARI}} earned 188 yards from scrimmage and two TDs on just 13 touches in his first-ever college game. The remainder of his true freshman season was just as incredible, as Moore accrued 114 catches for 1,258 yards and 12 TDs. Scott Barrett notes the most impressive aspects of that campaign, writing, “he had forced 37 missed tackles as a receiver (the most by any Power-5 WR since 2015), gained 385 yards after contact (second only to Ja’Marr Chase’s 2019 season), and totaled 892 yards after the catch (second only to DeVonta Smith’s 2020 season). For his efforts, he was awarded a 90.4 receiving grade from PFF – one of the highest grades ever given to an underclassman.”

The remainder of Moore’s career was largely spent nursing a nagging hamstring injury, as he would only wind up playing six more full college games. Regardless, his god-tier breakout age, excellent athleticism, absurd college target share of 31.4%, and incredible YAC ability (70% of his receiving yards came after the catch) make Moore one of the most talented WRs in an already stacked class.

At just 5’7”, his major flaw is his height, and it likely forces him into a slot role at the next level. He also ran a limited, almost exclusively underneath route tree at Purdue, and saw 24% of his career receiving production come on screens. Thankfully, he was drafted to a team that leans on underneath routes (Kyler Murray attempted the 10th-most passes of 1-9 yards last year) and screens (3rd most in 2020). Head coach Kliff Kingsbury implied Moore would play immediately, and also discussed how Arizona views him as a versatile piece and wants to use him like he was used at Purdue. If so, we should see Arizona leaning on Moore heavily within 10 yards, and that could make him one of the sneakiest PPR cheat-code selections in any format this year.

Los Angeles Rams

Round 2, Pick 25: Tutu Atwell, WR, Louisville

Week 1 Projection: Second-String WR

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 23 (WR11)

BestBall10s ADP: 240.97 (WR133)

Underdog ADP: 214.2 (WR100)

At 5’9”, 155, Tutu Atwell is both one of the smallest WRs (in an already small class) and one of the most electrifying. His college highlights (while not as legendary) remind me quite a bit of Tavon Austin, and they also showcase his primary role: a situational deep-threat and a heavily-motioned end-around/jet sweep gimmick player. That fits in nicely to a Rams’ offense that just added the typically aggressive Matthew Stafford and that utilizes jet motion at one of the highest rates in the league. Sean McVay didn’t seem eager to thrust Atwell into a starting role however, saying: “I think Tutu has a unique opportunity to come in and learn from really some great veterans that have produced at a high level. He’s going to get a chance to come in and compete and add depth to a great group. How big that role is, is up to him.” Atwell will see some schemed touches, but in a crowded WR room, I’m skeptical he’ll do much more. I’m not touching him in redraft or best ball for that reason, but he’s certainly worth hanging onto in dynasty if he manages to earn the vacated deep targets DeSean Jackson leaves behind when he becomes a UFA in 2022.

Round 4, Pick 36: Jacob Harris, WR/TE, UCF

Week 1 Projection: Third-String TE

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 60 (WR29)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: 216.0 (WR135)

A WR on most sites but a TE on others, Jacob Harris’s positional eligibility could be the largest factor in his dynasty value. He’s an absurd athlete who set more noteworthy historical marks on his pro-day tests than Kyle Pitts. He was never particularly efficient nor productive at UCF, but the athleticism plus a switch to TE translates to significant long-term upside for the 24-year-old. Speaking of a position change, Rams GM Les Snead indicated that the coaching staff would “groom him to be a TE”. Since Harris played WR exclusively at UCF (and weighed in at 219 pounds), it’ll be at least a season before we see him make any significant offensive impact. Even so, he’ll be an immediate contributor on special teams, and given his outstanding potential upside, absolutely has an argument to be drafted as a top-5 dynasty rookie TE.

Round 7, Pick 5: Jake Funk, RB, Maryland

Week 1 Projection: Practice Squad RB

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 70 (RB19)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

Jake Funk offers strong athletic traits with a 83.8 SPORQ score, along with a 98th percentile college YPC of 8.6 despite tearing his ACL twice during his time at Maryland. Athletes of Funk’s quality should absolutely be monitored over the next two preseasons to assess their development and prospective playing time, but it’s always an uphill battle for players drafted this late, as Funk is currently listed as the Rams’ RB5 and would need to seriously impress to be active on Sundays.

Round 7, Pick 22: Ben Skowronek, WR, Notre Dame

Week 1 Projection: Third-String WR

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: N/A

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

A big bodied (6’2”, 220) WR who almost exclusively played outside during his five seasons in college, Ben Skowronek doesn’t have the athletic or efficiency (1.31 career YPRR) profile of a player most would consider likely to be successful in the NFL. Greg Cosell did note that Skowronek uses his size well, saying “he was effective defeating press coverage, especially on fades and back-shoulder throws, and that made him a strong red-zone weapon.” His overall profile comes off as incredibly average, and barring the complete decimation of the Rams receiving corps, Skowronek can be safely ignored.

San Francisco 49ers

Round 1, Pick 3: Trey Lance, QB, North Dakota State

Week 1 Projection: Second-String QB

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: 188 (QB26)

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 15 (QB3)

BestBall10s ADP: 224.05 (QB31)

Underdog ADP: 117.4 (QB15)

Trey Lance crucially offers the best rushing upside of any QB in this class. He’s earned an insane 5.16 career YCO/A, and forced 40 missed tackles on just 134 rush attempts during his only full season as a starter at NDSU. Playing for the coach who orchestrated Robert Griffin III’s illustrious rookie campaign and averaging 13.3 rushing FPG in college translate to Lance’s Konami Code upside being off the charts.

As inexperienced as they come with just 388 career college dropbacks, Lance is, however, a developmental project as a passer. Greg Cosell, PFF’s Mike Renner, and Wes Huber all acknowledged his primary flaw is his passing accuracy, but that interestingly didn’t translate into many turnovers in college, as Lance recorded an impressively low 1.4 turnover worthy play pecentage at NDSU, per PFF. Having just turned 21, he’s one of the youngest players in the class and enters arguably the best possible landing spot in the 49ers. He’ll likely back up Jimmy Garoppolo to start the season, but he’s a near-lock to step into the starting job at some point in 2021. When exactly Lance starts is unknown, but regardless, 3QB teams should love taking a shot on Lance in best ball, redraft teams should view him as a likely league-winner late in the season, and dynasty teams can justifiably select him as rookie QB1.

Round 3, Pick 25: Trey Sermon, RB, Ohio State

Week 1 Projection: Second-String RB

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: 124 (RB41)

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 11 (RB4)

BestBall10s ADP: 183.54 (RB48)

Underdog ADP: 75.9 (RB29)

Consistently efficient in college, Trey Sermon showcased his NFL potential by ranking fourth best in career rushing missed tackles forced per attempt (0.32) and fifth-best in yards after contact per reception (5.2) since 2014. His athletic traits are solid, albeit unspectacular, but what really stands out about Sermon is the glowing review from our own Wes Huber. I consider that overview of Sermon a must-read to understand his true fantasy potential, especially after landing in San Francisco — one of the most RB efficient offenses in the league. With Jeff Wilson Jr. likely to miss the first 4-6 weeks of the season, Sermon has a clear path to become SF’s RB2, a job he’s certainly talented enough to keep once Wilson returns. He’s a top-40 RB in any best ball/redraft format, and the clear RB4 in rookie drafts.

Round 6, Pick 10: Elijah Mitchell, RB, Louisiana-Lafayette

Week 1 Projection: Practice Squad RB

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: N/A

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 30 (RB9)

BestBall10s ADP: N/A

Underdog ADP: N/A

Elijah Mitchell’s elite SPORQ score of 94.9 plus strong efficiency numbers (top-7 in missed tackles forced per touch at 0.30 and yards after contact per attempt at 4.04) make him arguably the most underrated dynasty RB. While SF RBs have been rather injury prone over the last few seasons, it’s unlikely Mitchell sees playing time until 2022, when Raheem Mostert, Jeff Wilson Jr., and Wayne Gallman all become UFAs. While uncertain, the potential departures of all three veteran RBs would open the door for Mitchell to join an RBBC with Trey Sermon (or at the very least enter the RB rotation), and given how thin rookie dynasty drafts are after RB6, the upside here is just too good to let Mitchell slip past rookie RB10.

Seattle Seahawks

Round 2, Pick 24: D’Wayne Eskridge, WR, Western Michigan

Week 1 Projection: Second-String WR

Fantasy Points Best Ball Consensus: 234 (WR94)

Huber’s Dynasty Rank: 19 (WR11)

BestBall10s ADP: 240.11 (WR100)

Underdog ADP: 196.3 (WR83)

An undersized (5’9”, 190), freak athlete who primarily played outside at Western Michigan, D’Wayne Eskridge was unfortunately praised more for his versatility by Seahawks GM John Schneider and HC Pete Carroll than his receiving ability. Scott Barrett notes this in his Day 2 Post-draft Presser Review, saying there was “little discussion over his hands or route-running ability. They like his competitiveness and speed, his run-blocking, his physicality (‘he’s a dog’), his versatility (‘he can play outside and in the slot’), but again, they made little mention of what he brings to the table as a true WR. Well, minus one thing. Eventually Carroll said, ‘We see him as a deep threat.’”

That makes him arguably the least sexy WR (from a fantasy perspective) drafted on Day 2. I won’t be seeking out Eskridge in best ball or redraft this year, but the athletic profile, draft capital behind him, and his main competition being Freddie Swain all make for a bullish long-term outlook, exemplified by his dynasty ranking of WR11.

Jake Tribbey is a recent college graduate and lifelong football fan obsessed with extracting every edge possible from NFL DFS, Best Ball, and player props/futures.