You are reading the 2023 Prospect Guide. For the NEW 2024 Prospect Guide, click here!
Jaxon
Smith-Njigba
Junior
WR
Ohio State
Buckeyes
Ohio State Buckeyes Logo
Grades
Score Overall
90.4 11
Position Day
1 1
Score Position Day Overall
90.4 1 1 11
Measurables & Drills
Height: 6' 1/2" Weight: 196 lbs
Hands: 9 Arms: 30.5
40 YD Dash: -- 10 YD Split: --
Vertical: 35 Broad: 125
Shuttle: 3.93 Cone: 6.57
Height: 6' 1/2" Hands: 9 40 YD Dash: --
Weight: 196 lbs Arms: 30.5 10 YD Split: --
Broad: 125 Cone: 6.57
Vertical: 35 Shuttle: 3.93
Height: 6' 1/2" Hands: 9 40 YD Dash: -- Broad: 125 Cone: 6.57
Weight: 196 lbs Arms: 30.5 10 YD Split: -- Vertical: 35 Shuttle: 3.93
The Story

Smith-Njigba was a highly sought-after 5-star recruit out of Rockwell, Texas who chose to play collegiately at Ohio State. Landing on a team with three future first-round picks at WR, Smith-Njigba had a slow start to his college career, registering just 10 catches as a freshman. After the transfer of Jameson Williams, he earned a starting spot in 2021 as a true sophomore and took his game to the next level, earning 3rd team All-Big Ten and 3rd team All-American honors. He also set the record for most receiving yards in a single season in Big Ten history (1,606) and put up an impressive performance in the 2022 Rose Bowl game breaking the record for most receiving yards in an FBS bowl (347). Unfortunately, Smith-Njigba didn’t get to follow up his historic 2021 season due to injuries sustained early in his junior campaign.

Strengths
  • Silky-smooth route-running extraordinaire who generates separation at will. JSN tape is basically a route-running clinic, especially in the short and intermediate parts of the field. Starting with the mental aspect of the game, Smith-Njigba is a super high IQ route runner. His spatial awareness is outstanding, and he truly grasps what the defense is trying to do on each play, allowing him to take advantage of leverage and blindspots at will — he almost seems like a quarterback with his ability to read coverages. Against zone, he is excellent at exploiting soft spots and making himself an easy target for the quarterback. Against man, he has the shake, footwork, and crisp breaks in his routes to generate easy separation.

  • Great ball skills, hands, and toughness at the catchpoint. With great ball skills, you will almost never find Smith-Njigba out of position at the catch point. He tracks it well and gets his body in position to secure the ball. Furthermore, JSN has some of the most reliable hands in the class. He greets the football decisively and maintains focus through the catch, squeezing the football and securing it to his frame. He maintains this discipline in heavy traffic and while absorbing contact at the catch point as well. He has some of the wildest "did he catch that?" moments you will see in college football.

  • Plays with great balance and body control. JSN is always in control of his body, whether securing a catch or absorbing contact through his route. It is almost impossible to get him off of his spot.

  • Monster after the catch. This is probably my favorite part of his game, and perhaps an underrated one in the scouting community at that. Smith-Njigba has a really developed lower half that allows him to play much bigger than his 195-pound frame would suggest. He runs with extreme competitiveness and physicality oftentimes just outright refusing to be tackled. He runs through arm tacklers at will and has nasty juke moves to make guys miss in the open field.

Weaknesses
  • Not an exceptional athlete. The one thing separating JSN from being considered a Ja’Marr Chase level prospect is his athletic profile. While he isn’t a bad athlete by any means, his lack of a top gear really puts a ceiling on his potential and ability to win vertically in the NFL. On tape, you will see him struggle to pull away from college safeties and nickel CBs, which suggests he’ll struggle to do so in the NFL.

  • Limited catch radius. We don’t really have any tape of Smith-Njigba "selling out" for a ball and getting airborne to make a catch. Almost all of his receptions are at ground level. The lack of tape doesn’t mean he can’t do it, but it is definitely a question mark and perhaps another limitation that caps his ceiling as a player.

  • Might translate best as a slot-only receiver. This doesn’t carry the same stigma as it used to, but some teams could still view this as limiting, especially considering his entire track record at OSU was from the slot. Personally, I think he has all the traits to be a tremendous weapon that can line up anywhere.

  • One-hit wonder. By sitting most of his freshman year and outright missing most of his junior year, we really only have one year of production, his historic sophomore campaign. Luckily for him, that one year was dominant.

Final Points

Every time I watch Smith-Njigba, I can’t help but think of Lions wide receiver Amon-Ra St. Brown. In fact, I don’t think I have felt so comfortable about a comparison in my life, and I first made this comp in the spring of 2022. Before you let Amon-Ra’s 4th-round draft capital scare you, please note I had a top-40 grade on him in his draft class. To boot, JSN is a better version of him, in my opinion, especially as a YAC player who should thrive on designed touches. I am also cautious to fall into the trap many did with Justin Jefferson when they claimed he was a slot-only type receiver. In the end, he scores as a firm first-round player for me and is a top-5 player at his position. I believe his refined skill set offers teams an instant producer who is one of the most bust-proof players in the class.

Jordan
Addison
Junior
WR
USC
Trojans
USC Trojans Logo
Grades
Score Overall
89.7 16
Position Day
2 1
Score Position Day Overall
89.7 2 1 16
Measurables & Drills
Height: 5' 11" Weight: 173 lbs
Hands: 8.75 Arms: 30.88
40 YD Dash: 4.49 10 YD Split: 1.56
Vertical: 34 Broad: 122
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 5' 11" Hands: 8.75 40 YD Dash: 4.49
Weight: 173 lbs Arms: 30.88 10 YD Split: 1.56
Broad: 122 Cone: --
Vertical: 34 Shuttle: --
Height: 5' 11" Hands: 8.75 40 YD Dash: 4.49 Broad: 122 Cone: --
Weight: 173 lbs Arms: 30.88 10 YD Split: 1.56 Vertical: 34 Shuttle: --
The Story

Addison, hailing from Frederick, Maryland, was a highly sought-after 4-star recruit. He ultimately committed to the University of Pittsburgh, where he went on to have standout freshman and sophomore campaigns. As a freshman, Addison wasted no time making an impact, leading the Panthers in receiving yards and earning ACC Rookie of the Year runner-up honors. Addison continued his success with a monster sophomore campaign, in which he was named the 2021 Biletnikoff Award winner as the nation's top receiver. He was also named a consensus All-American and earned first-team All-ACC honors that same year. In 2022, after transferring to USC, Addison tied a bow on one of the most decorated careers of recent memories by earning first-team All-PAC-12 honors.

Strengths
  • Easy separator with high caliber polish and technique running routes. Addison's separation skills at ALL levels of the field are top-notch, as he utilizes a variety of techniques/traits to get open on the field. He has a keen understanding of how to attack a defender's leverage, using his knowledge to manipulate the defender and create space. Additionally, Addison is adept at utilizing tempo changes in his routes, allowing him to set up defenders and make sharp cuts for easy separation. With a crafty release package, Addison can stay clean off the line of scrimmage and quickly get into his route. All of this, combined with his explosiveness in and out of his breaks, makes Addison a nightmare to cover.

  • Athleticism is a strength. While Addison isn’t going to be a Ja’Marr Chase or DK Metcalf level athlete at the WR position, I do believe his athleticism is a major asset that he can rely on to help him win at the next level. He possesses A-tier acceleration, good leaping ability, and good top speed, while also showcasing excellent quickness and lateral agility.

  • RAC is a big part of his game. Addison is an asset on designed touches and after the catch. His combo of burst, vision in the open field, and "make-you-miss" moves make him a player for whom coaches will want to scheme touches game in and game out.

  • Positional versatility is a calling card. He has experience playing every WR spot from a variety of formational alignments. Addison will slide into any NFL offense ready to rock and roll.

  • Hot motor makes him a coach's dream. Addison gives his all on every play. He runs every route hard and competes to maximize yards on every touch. He is disciplined on scramble drills and works hard in the run game despite his smaller size and general lack of play strength.

Weaknesses
  • Slender build with an evident lack of play strength. Addison’s build seems to be far more common in recent drafts than, say, 10 years ago, but it is still worth noting how thin he is. Play strength is definitely an issue at times and is most evident on contested catch opportunities. It is really the only thing holding him back from a crystal-clear skill summary.

  • Concentration drops were an issue in his time at Pittsburgh. Generally speaking, Addison seemed to have reliable hands during his college career. But, he did suffer from occasional random drops, on which he failed to secure the ball to his frame and squeeze the football. With that said, I have no concerns with the way Addison greets the ball in the air.

  • Missed a decent amount of time in two of his three seasons. Specifically, leg and ankle injuries cost him multiple games in 2022, including USC’s bowl game.

Final Points

Addison’s weaknesses are few and far between, thus making him one of the safest players in this draft class. He is a day-one starter in the NFL and is a player to build around on offense. Technically speaking, there isn’t a team he doesn’t make sense for. He scores as a first-round pick in my eyes and is my top-rated WR in this year’s class.

Quentin
Johnston
Junior
WR
TCU
Horned Frogs
TCU Horned Frogs Logo
Grades
Score Overall
89.5 18
Position Day
3 1
Score Position Day Overall
89.5 3 1 18
Measurables & Drills
Height: 6' 3" Weight: 208 lbs
Hands: 9.63 Arms: 33.63
40 YD Dash: -- 10 YD Split: --
Vertical: 40.5 Broad: 134
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 6' 3" Hands: 9.63 40 YD Dash: --
Weight: 208 lbs Arms: 33.63 10 YD Split: --
Broad: 134 Cone: --
Vertical: 40.5 Shuttle: --
Height: 6' 3" Hands: 9.63 40 YD Dash: -- Broad: 134 Cone: --
Weight: 208 lbs Arms: 33.63 10 YD Split: -- Vertical: 40.5 Shuttle: --
The Story

Johnston was a 4-star recruit out of Temple, Texas. After a standout high school career in which he also dominated in track and basketball, he went on to play his college football at TCU. In his time with the Horned Frogs, Johnston became a force, earning 1st team All-Big 12 honors in both 2021 and 2022. Johnston averaged a ridiculous 19.0 yards per catch over the course of three seasons at TCU.

Strengths
  • Freaky athlete with exceptional size. The number one thing to be excited about with Johnston is his rare blend of size, speed, and lateral quickness. This combination of physical traits is an attractive one and makes his ceiling one of the most exciting in the entire Draft.

  • Explosive playmaking ability. Shocker! Johnston’s crazy athletic ability and body control pop when he has the ball in his hands. In the time I have been scouting draft classes (eight years), I have never seen anyone — let alone a 6'4"-plus receiver — comfortably hit spin moves in the open field as often as Johnston does. When he has the ball in his hands, every defender needs to be on notice, as he can outrun you, make you miss, or just play through you.

  • Complete deep threat skill set, more than just fast. Johnston has plenty of speed and acceleration to destroy cushions and stack defenders, but he also has much more than that. Johnston also possesses exceptional body control and ball-tracking abilities that allow him to finish plays at a high rate. He can make mid-flight adjustments to the ball while also contorting his body mid-air to make contested catches in heavy traffic. These skills, combined with his astute knowledge of body positioning, make him a valuable target on back shoulder throws against tight man coverage or between the corner and safety in cover-2 looks.

  • Underrated route runner with room to grow. At the top of his route, Johnston showcases exceptional hip and ankle flexibility to pair with his violent cutting ability, which enables him to change direction and accelerate out of his breaks with ease. His movements are incredibly smooth and fluid, particularly impressive given his size. The biggest point of concern with Johnston’s route running is the TCU playbook and the limitations of what he was asked to do in college. His route tree basically consisted of go-balls, hitches, and slants, with some deep crossers and screens mixed in. It is also worth pointing out that Johnston has a very good understanding of zone defense and did a good job of working into space on deep crossers, whether that meant getting across a safety's face or sitting his route down. Johnston can create separation at all levels of the field.

Weaknesses
  • Not a large or impressive resume vs. press coverage. We know Johnston has all the traits in the world to beat press coverage, but the reality is he just hasn’t had to do it a whole lot. Most of Johnston’s developed release game is him attacking defenders aligning with a big cushion.

  • Limited route tree. I already mentioned Johnston’s route tree as a potential concern, but it is worth noting in more detail. Typically speaking, NFL offenses include a much more nuanced playbook with hundreds of variations of routes, double moves, and timing-based concepts. TCUs playbook was very limited, required less timing and more freelancing, and prioritized spread looks and space. There could be a steep transition to an NFL playbook.

  • Physicality and play strength disappear at the catch point at times. For how gifted and super-sized athlete Johnston is, and how strong he looks in most facets of the game, it is both puzzling and concerning how easily he allows DBs to out-muscle him in contested situations. This could explain his general lack of TD production as well.

Final Points

If I were strictly a traits scout, Johnston would easily be the top WR in the draft class. He has everything you could covet from a physical standpoint, plus a good bit of alignment versatility. His ability in the gadget/screen game also gives him a comfortable path to playing time as he transitions to the NFL. With that said, there are enough concerns to foresee a steep learning curve to becoming a full-time player, especially considering the likely draft capital investment it will take to acquire him. His lack of production, in contrast to his skill summary, also needs explaining. Christian Watson is a great comparison, in my opinion, as very similar players in both skills and deficiencies. In the end, I am absolutely betting on the traits with Johnston. He scores as a first-round player for me and ranks inside the top-5 positionally.

Zay
Flowers
Senior
WR
Boston College
Eagles
Boston College Eagles Logo
Grades
Score Overall
87.2 26
Position Day
4 2
Score Position Day Overall
87.2 4 2 26
Measurables & Drills
Height: 5' 9" Weight: 182 lbs
Hands: 9.25 Arms: 29.25
40 YD Dash: 4.42 10 YD Split: 1.53
Vertical: 35.5 Broad: 127
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 5' 9" Hands: 9.25 40 YD Dash: 4.42
Weight: 182 lbs Arms: 29.25 10 YD Split: 1.53
Broad: 127 Cone: --
Vertical: 35.5 Shuttle: --
Height: 5' 9" Hands: 9.25 40 YD Dash: 4.42 Broad: 127 Cone: --
Weight: 182 lbs Arms: 29.25 10 YD Split: 1.53 Vertical: 35.5 Shuttle: --
The Story

Flowers, hailing from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, was a 3-star high school recruit. Flowers received offers from numerous top programs before ultimately choosing to play for Boston College. In his college football career, Flowers has established himself as one of the most explosive and reliable receivers in the country. He was named to the All-ACC team in each of the past three seasons, including first-team honors in 2020 and 2022.

Strengths

Dynamic athlete with "take the top off" speed. Flowers biggest calling card is his athleticism. His deep speed is tremendous, and he is a true math-changer at the position. His production on deep balls in 2022 was crazy as well — the eye test tells me that probably half of his production in 2022 came on the deep throws.

"Make-you-miss-in-a-phone-booth" RAC ability. Flowers has the most ridiculous change-of-direction ability in this class. He has the ability to plant and redirect with ease but also does it with such explosiveness he can leave defenders truly wondering what just happened. For a guy with this skill set, it's crazy how infrequently he was used in the screen/gadget game. The right NFL team could take him to another level.

Mismatch weapon in the slot. While Flowers can certainly play on the outside given his speed, using him in the slot and in bunch formations to get him favorable matchups and free releases brings added value to any offense. There aren’t many safeties who can run with him, so attacking two-high zone coverage looks from the slot with him could yield incredible results.

Weaknesses

Could develop more as a route runner. It’s scary to think of what Flowers could be if he develops his route running and learns techniques like altering his tempo, attacking leverage, and getting off press man. Right now, he relies almost solely on his athleticism to win routes, and it has worked just fine to this point. Flowers also needs to develop a more savvy game when defeating zone coverage, especially on those deep crossers where he needs to sit his route down and play in defenders' blindspots.

Tiny frame with limited play strength. Flowers will be lucky to weigh 180 pounds at the Combine, and just like a lot of these smaller guys, the issues that come with being small are evident… play strength being the main one.

Quarterbacks have to put the ball right on him. This is sort of a double down on the size issue, but Flowers also compounds the issue by not attacking the football with extended arms consistently. His ball skills on high velocity or flatter throws aren’t great either, he struggles to get himself into position to make a catch which leads to some wasted opportunities.

Final Points

Flowers is one of the most electric prospects in this class and immediately offers a team dynamic playmaking ability at all three levels of the field. The deficiencies he has as a player are easily overcome by his physical traits. I see glimpses of a more explosive Golden Tate when watching him. While his size dictates he will play in the slot a good bit, teams shouldn’t be shy about trying to ISO him on the outside. Flowers scores as a late first-round pick for me and is in my top-5 positionally.

Jalin
Hyatt
Junior
WR
Tennessee
Volunteers
Tennessee Volunteers Logo
Grades
Score Overall
86.6 31
Position Day
5 2
Score Position Day Overall
86.6 5 2 31
Measurables & Drills
Height: 6' Weight: 176 lbs
Hands: 9 Arms: 32.5
40 YD Dash: 4.4 10 YD Split: 1.5
Vertical: 40 Broad: 135
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 6' Hands: 9 40 YD Dash: 4.4
Weight: 176 lbs Arms: 32.5 10 YD Split: 1.5
Broad: 135 Cone: --
Vertical: 40 Shuttle: --
Height: 6' Hands: 9 40 YD Dash: 4.4 Broad: 135 Cone: --
Weight: 176 lbs Arms: 32.5 10 YD Split: 1.5 Vertical: 40 Shuttle: --
The Story

Hyatt, a native of Irmo, South Carolina, was a 4-star recruit coming out of Dutch Fork High School. He caught the attention of college football programs across the country with his electric speed and game-breaking ability, ultimately committing to the University of Tennessee. Hyatt saw very little playing time during his freshman and sophomore years before exploding into the national spotlight as a junior, when he won the Biletnikoff Award as college football's best receiver and was selected as a unanimous 1st-team All-American. His signature moment came against Alabama, in which he racked up over 200 yards receiving and 5 touchdowns.

Strengths
  • Elite vertical receiving skill set. The starting point for any Hyatt discussion is his incredible speed. He ran an official 10.46 100m in high school, and it translates directly to the football field, where he can outrun just about every corner lined up across from him, especially when given a free release. On top of that, Hyatt also displays easy ball-tracking skills, comfortably chasing down deep balls and making catches over his shoulder in stride, like a center fielder chasing down a line drive. His game-breaking speed forces defenses to change the way they play.

  • Can play above the rim. While, ideally, Hyatt is paired with a QB who can lead him deep, it's not the only way to utilize him downfield, as he has great leaping ability and a body that can contort in air/make adjustments on the fly.

  • Explosive and elusive with his route running. Hyatt’s game is not just pure speed, as he has the ability to explode in and out of breaks comfortably. In conjunction with his ability to stack defenders immediately, he should get more use on hitches and out routes at the NFL level.

  • Home-run hitting potential with the ball in his hands. Hyatt’s speed easily shows up when he has the ball in his hands. While he won’t be the most elusive "make you miss" type of player in the open field, his speed and acceleration break the angles of defenders leading to easy yards after the catch.

Weaknesses
  • Scheme and usage at Tennessee could be a detriment for NFL transition. Tennessee’s extreme spread and tempo-based offense maximized Hyatt’s ability by giving him free releases from the slot, often leaving him one on one with disadvantaged slot corners or safeties who simply couldn’t run with Hyatt. Ultimately on tape, Hyatt has shown an undeveloped route tree. Questions to ask include: What happens when defenders get their hands on him at the line of scrimmage? How will Hyatt adjust to much tighter spaces in the middle of the field? Will his new offensive coordinator go completely out of his way to ensure Hyatt stays on the move and gets free off the line of scrimmage?

  • Slender build with a lack of play strength. Hyatt’s listed weight of 175 pounds is pretty light, and his lack of play strength is evident in many scenarios, including at the catch point and in the run game as a blocker.

Final Points

While Hyatt has some legitimate questions about him moving forward, Hyatt’s skill set is still worth spending a top-40 pick on. Officially, he grades as a late first-round pick for me, and he is one of my favorite receivers in this class.

A.T.
Perry
Junior
WR
Wake Forest
Demon Deacons
Wake Forest Demon Deacons Logo
Grades
Score Overall
84.2 43
Position Day
6 2
Score Position Day Overall
84.2 6 2 43
Measurables & Drills
Height: 6' 3 1/2" Weight: 198 lbs
Hands: 9.25 Arms: 33.25
40 YD Dash: 4.47 10 YD Split: 1.59
Vertical: 35 Broad: 133
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 6' 3 1/2" Hands: 9.25 40 YD Dash: 4.47
Weight: 198 lbs Arms: 33.25 10 YD Split: 1.59
Broad: 133 Cone: --
Vertical: 35 Shuttle: --
Height: 6' 3 1/2" Hands: 9.25 40 YD Dash: 4.47 Broad: 133 Cone: --
Weight: 198 lbs Arms: 33.25 10 YD Split: 1.59 Vertical: 35 Shuttle: --
The Story

Perry, a native of Birmingham, Alabama, was a relatively under-the-radar recruit coming out of high school. Despite this, he caught the attention of Wake Forest University, where he went on to have a very impressive college football career racking up nearly 2,400 receiving yards and 26 touchdowns in his final two seasons. Perry was named 1st team All-ACC in 2021 and 2022.

Strengths
  • Prototypical "X" receiver frame and massive catch radius make him a nightmare for defenders. Standing at nearly 6'4" with long arms and a strong vertical leap, Perry can high-point the ball with ease and create late separation from smaller defenders with his size. His ability to make contested catches and extend for balls outside his body creates a massive catch radius, making him a valuable target for quarterbacks looking to move the chains, take shots downfield, or throw up jump balls in the end zone.

  • Elite ball tracking skills matched with elite body control. Perry shows the ability to contort in midair. His flexible lower and upper half can work independently of each other, allowing him to adjust to the ball while maintaining balance and control. On throws tight to the boundary and endline, Perry shows the ability to get his feet to the ground to establish possession.

  • A+ athletic profile. Perry’s acceleration, long speed, and short-area quickness/agility exceed expectations for someone of his size. His ability to burst off the line and hit top speed quickly allows him to quickly stack opposing DBs and create displacement on vertical stems.

  • Technical and nuanced route runner. Perry’s ability to maintain acceleration through harsh breaks allows him to quickly create separation from defenders and make tough catches. His good hip sink, despite his long legs, allows him to quickly change direction and make sharp cuts. On vertical routes especially, Perry shows attention to detail and precision in his route running.

Weaknesses
  • Relatively skinny frame. Perry likely needs to add some weight to his slight frame. Play strength wasn’t necessarily an issue in college, but the demands of the NFL are far more rigorous.

  • No YAC element to his game whatsoever. Perry lacks elusiveness and competitiveness with the ball in his hands. For a man of his stature, you would expect to at least see him battle defensive backs looking to tackle him for some extra yards.

  • Positional versatility is not his calling card… at least not yet. Perry almost exclusively lined up wide at "X." He has very limited experience working from the slot, reductions, or in bunch formations. Teams that prefer their wide receivers to move all over the formation might view his transition to the NFL as a steep one. From a traits perspective, he certainly has the ability to develop a slot game, though.

Final Points

With the Draft and free agency being scarce with true X-type receivers, Perry will be a sight for sore eyes. When you stack up his physical traits, his college production, and his accolades, I have a very hard time believing teams don’t see him as a day-2 prospect. Officially he scores as an early to mid-day 2 prospect for me and is one of my favorite "value" propositions in this draft.

Marvin
Mims Jr.
Junior
WR
Oklahoma
Sooners
Oklahoma Sooners Logo
Grades
Score Overall
83.5 50
Position Day
7 2
Score Position Day Overall
83.5 7 2 50
Measurables & Drills
Height: 5' 11" Weight: 183 lbs
Hands: 9 Arms: 31.63
40 YD Dash: 4.38 10 YD Split: 1.55
Vertical: 39.5 Broad: 129
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 5' 11" Hands: 9 40 YD Dash: 4.38
Weight: 183 lbs Arms: 31.63 10 YD Split: 1.55
Broad: 129 Cone: --
Vertical: 39.5 Shuttle: --
Height: 5' 11" Hands: 9 40 YD Dash: 4.38 Broad: 129 Cone: --
Weight: 183 lbs Arms: 31.63 10 YD Split: 1.55 Vertical: 39.5 Shuttle: --
The Story

Mims is from Frisco, Texas and attended Lone Star High School. He set the state record for receiving yards in both a season (2,629) and a career (5,485) during his time at Lone Star High School. He was a four-star recruit coming out of high school and received offers from over 25 FBS schools. He initially committed to Stanford, but eventually decommitted to play football at the University of Oklahoma, where he made an immediate impact. Mims became the first wide receiver in OU history to earn FWAA Freshman All-America in 2020. He has since gone on to be named second-team All-Big 12 that same year, and in 2021 he earned All-Big 12 honorable mention. In his final season at Oklahoma in 2022, Mims was named first-team All-Big 12.

Strengths
  • Explosive yet smooth athlete. The long speed is exceptional. He accelerates to top speed quickly and catches DBs off guard. You can almost see the body control in the way he runs as he routinely glides past defenders. Mims can also jump out of the gym and play above the rim.

  • Ability to be a great route runner. Mims has the quick twitch and lower half flexibility to allow him to make sharp breaks in and out of his cuts. While he didn’t run an overly complex route tree at Oklahoma, all the traits are there for him to excel as a route runner. Furthermore, he does already have a good understanding of some of the finer details. For example, he attacks space and leverage when given a cushion at a high level. When he runs vertical stems, he purposefully threatens the DB’s outside shoulder and loves to lean on the CB, creating an element of deception to mix in breaks and set up double moves.

  • Top-notch vertical skill set. Mims has the ball skills and deep tracking ability to pair with his athleticism to make him a formidable WR downfield. His consistency at the catch point is nearly miraculous given his size. Mims plays significantly bigger than his 5’11 183 pound frame would suggest he should, and it is a site to behold. His body control is also a huge plus. For a guy with limited length, he really maximizes his catch radius with late adjustments and tremendous leaping ability. These are translatable skills at the next level.

  • Legitimate RAC threat. Being used as mostly a deep threat really limited Mims’ ability to showcase his run-after-catch ability, however, when given the chance on underneath throws and screens, you really see him put all those physical traits to use to be a menace in the open field. Very underrated part of his game.

  • Inside/out versatility. Mims profiles as a slot type from a size perspective, but his explosiveness, propensity to play big at the catch point, and traits to beat press tell me he should hold up on the outside just fine in the NFL. He is a versatile weapon.

Weaknesses
  • Production profile could be considered flimsy. Oklahoma’s system was excellent at getting Mims free releases into space where he could put that speed and quickness on full display. He could see a sizable adjustment period as he learns how to operate in tighter spaces and play through more physicality at the line of scrimmage.

  • Ran a limited route tree in college. This isn’t uncommon these days, but it does suggest the potential for a steep learning curve in the NFL. He will likely need to work on his precision and timing with short and intermediate routes.

  • Small frame with limited length. Mims is a touch undersized by NFL standards and has sub 32" arms. While he does a good job mitigating that with his play, physical limitations don’t completely go away.

Final Points

Mims profiles as a plug-and-play, versatile receiver who should be productive very early in his career. If Mims hits his ceiling, he could develop into a #1 for a team, but I think he is probably best served as a #2. His skill set and physical profile give a team an immediate deep threat with the chance to contribute elsewhere as well. He is one of my favorite prospects in this WR class and officially scores as a round-2 player for me.

Tyler
Scott
Junior
WR
Cincinnati
Bearcats
Cincinnati Bearcats Logo
Grades
Score Overall
83.2 52
Position Day
8 2
Score Position Day Overall
83.2 8 2 52
Measurables & Drills
Height: 5' 9 1/2" Weight: 177 lbs
Hands: 9 Arms: 30.88
40 YD Dash: 4.44 10 YD Split: 1.51
Vertical: 39.5 Broad: 133
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 5' 9 1/2" Hands: 9 40 YD Dash: 4.44
Weight: 177 lbs Arms: 30.88 10 YD Split: 1.51
Broad: 133 Cone: --
Vertical: 39.5 Shuttle: --
Height: 5' 9 1/2" Hands: 9 40 YD Dash: 4.44 Broad: 133 Cone: --
Weight: 177 lbs Arms: 30.88 10 YD Split: 1.51 Vertical: 39.5 Shuttle: --
The Story

Scott, a wide receiver from Norton, Ohio, was a 3-star recruit out of high school who received many offers from power-5 schools, including Michigan State, Iowa State, and Syracuse. He went on to have a standout career at the University of Cincinnati, becoming a reliable target for the Bearcats. In 2022, Scott was named to the 2nd team All-AAC after racking up nearly 900 yards and 9 TDs.

Strengths
  • Explosive athlete. Scott accelerates to his elite level top speed very quickly. He has shown good leaping ability and the ability to explode in and out of breaks seamlessly. I expect him to run one of the fastest 40 times at the Combine.

  • Legitimate deep threat with developed vertical skills. Scott is very good with keeping defenders off balance on vertical stems and blending deception with his speed to generate easy separation. He attacks the outside shoulder of cornerbacks very well and forces them to respect that elite speed. He then is able to put his foot in the ground and explode into a post route or dig, oftentimes leaving the corner completely turned around.

  • Natural separator. Being able to threaten vertically at such a high level leads to Scott seeing massive cushions and immediate backpedals from DBs. He has the body control and flexibility in his ankles to convert those cushions into easy stops (hitches) or speed-outs. Can pick up "easy" yards in bunches this way.

  • Plays with eyes in the back of his head. Scott plays with incredible instincts and "feels" what is behind him at all times. It's wild how many times he has his back to a defender in pursuit after a catch, and he easily shakes them without being able to see them.

Weaknesses
  • Concentration drops. Scott has good technique greeting the football but occasionally fails to secure the ball to his frame, most noticeably when running through the middle of the field.

  • Lean frame with a lack of play strength. Like the other speedsters in this draft, Scott is very lean, and it shows up in his play strength. Scott struggles to sustain blocks in the run game and can find himself easily disrupted early in his routes if a DB gets his hands on him.

  • Limited reps vs. press in college. With Scott’s deep speed, it's rare he will see a ton of press in the NFL, but it is certainly worth noting that we don’t really know what he has to offer on that front as the reps were limited.

Final Points

Scott’s deep speed and vertical skill set make him a "math-changer" on offense which instantly makes me a fan of his. For teams looking to add a field stretcher to what they do but don’t want to invest the necessary capital to acquire a Jalin Hyatt, Scott is a great option a little bit later. Scott scores as a strong 2nd-round player for me, and I am comfortable with him at nearly any point during Day 2.

Jonathan
Mingo
Senior
WR
Ole Miss
Rebels
Ole Miss Rebels Logo
Grades
Score Overall
82.8 53
Position Day
9 2
Score Position Day Overall
82.8 9 2 53
Measurables & Drills
Height: 6' 1" Weight: 220 lbs
Hands: 10.38 Arms: 32.13
40 YD Dash: 4.46 10 YD Split: 1.54
Vertical: 39.5 Broad: 129
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 6' 1" Hands: 10.38 40 YD Dash: 4.46
Weight: 220 lbs Arms: 32.13 10 YD Split: 1.54
Broad: 129 Cone: --
Vertical: 39.5 Shuttle: --
Height: 6' 1" Hands: 10.38 40 YD Dash: 4.46 Broad: 129 Cone: --
Weight: 220 lbs Arms: 32.13 10 YD Split: 1.54 Vertical: 39.5 Shuttle: --
The Story

Mingo grew up in the small town Brandon, Mississippi. In high school, Mingo displayed versatility as a two-way player, excelling both on offense as a wide receiver and on defense as a safety. In addition to football, Mingo also lettered in baseball, showcasing his well-roundedness as a multi-sport athlete. His performance on the football field at Brandon High School led to a 4-star recruit rating and the #2 WR recruit from the state of Mississippi. He received offers from powerhouses all over the country — including Oregon, Auburn, Georgia, and Notre Dame — but ultimately decided to stay home and play at Ole Miss. There, Mingo set a school record for most receiving yards in a game with a staggering 247 yards against Vanderbilt in 2022.

Strengths
  • Fantastic size and athleticism combination. Mingo is a tremendously well-built physical specimen at WR. He is thick and physically strong, and it shows up all over his game, most notably at the catch point, where he easily frames and boxes out defensive backs to play the ball. For a class lacking bigger receivers, especially of the physical variety, Mingo brings a unique element to the table.

  • Untapped potential as a route runner. Mingo has good get-off speed and change-of-direction ability, especially when you consider his build. While the Ole Miss offense was very limiting to Mingo’s route tree, you see all the physical traits pop. He has the potential to develop crisp and explosive breaks as he works a more complex route tree. As of now, he boasts very smooth breaks highlighted by flexible ankles and the ability to start and stop. His release game is very good as well. He does a good job using both his hands and his feet to clear contact at the line of scrimmage and get into his route cleanly. Getting to watch Mingo in person down in Mobile for Senior Bowl week, I was really impressed with some more advanced route running, especially in the red zone. He put some stuff on tape he hadn’t previously, and that points to a more refined skill set than previously imagined, similar to the way **Terry McLaurin **impressed me back in 2019. As he develops, consistent separation will come.

  • Elite RAC threat. Mingo reminds me a ton of fellow former Ole Miss WR AJ Brown in both his ability after the catch and on deep targets. After the catch, Mingo turns into a running back with exceptional vision, contact balance, and the ability to make guys miss. He has a role in the NFL ib Day 1 as a guy you want to get in space.

  • Checks the boxes to be a legit deep threat at the next level. Ball skills, adequate top gear, body control, and physicality at the catch point — Mingo has everything you need to win deep in the NFL. The deep production was there in 2022 as well.

  • Positional versatility. Mingo can play all three receiver spots and has "power slot" potential as a guy who can see an offense run through him.

Weaknesses
  • Hands technique needs work. For the most part, Mingo greets the football well with hands extended away from his frame. He isn’t a clapper at all, which is a good thing, but far too often he opts to wait for the ball and allows it to get into his stomach/chest on routine plays. While the drops manifested a little bit, there were plenty of catches that didn’t look clean, which could suggest a potential problem at the next level. He seems more disciplined working in traffic, so it won’t necessarily be an issue in contested situations.

  • Lack of college production. If box score scouting is your thing, Mingo won’t be. Despite being a four-year starter, he really didn’t break out until this year. But a good bit of this is excusable, as he consistently played with NFL talent opposite him. Five of Mingo’s former WR teammates are on NFL rosters, including three 2nd-round picks.

Final Points

With his impressive athleticism, versatility, and knack for making big plays, Mingo is a prospect with immense potential as he looks to transition to the NFL. Mingo is arguably the most physical WR prospect in this draft class. His athleticism and size combo should endear him to a lot of teams, especially once you start to compare his developed skills against his deficiencies. The juice is well worth the squeeze here for Mingo, and he happens to be one of my favorite prospects in the class. Officially he scores as a firm day-2 player for me.

Cedric
Tillman
Senior
WR
Tennessee
Volunteers
Tennessee Volunteers Logo
Grades
Score Overall
82.4 57
Position Day
10 2
Score Position Day Overall
82.4 10 2 57
Measurables & Drills
Height: 6' 3" Weight: 213 lbs
Hands: 10 Arms: 32.75
40 YD Dash: 4.54 10 YD Split: 1.53
Vertical: 37 Broad: 128
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 6' 3" Hands: 10 40 YD Dash: 4.54
Weight: 213 lbs Arms: 32.75 10 YD Split: 1.53
Broad: 128 Cone: --
Vertical: 37 Shuttle: --
Height: 6' 3" Hands: 10 40 YD Dash: 4.54 Broad: 128 Cone: --
Weight: 213 lbs Arms: 32.75 10 YD Split: 1.53 Vertical: 37 Shuttle: --
The Story

Tillman was raised in Las Vegas, Nevada and went to Bishop Gorman High School. He comes from a football family — his father Cedric Sr. played wide receiver in the NFL for four seasons with the Denver Broncos and Jacksonville Jaguars. Tillman came out of high school as a 3-star recruit and received four FBS offers, including Hawaii and Tennessee. He chose to play football at Tennessee. After a few years as a backup, he burst onto the scene in 2021 as a redshirt junior. He was the first Tennessee wide receiver to have over 1,000 yards since 2012 and was recognized for his performance in the SEC. He was named to the 2021 All-SEC Second Team by Phil Steele and has been a consistent member of the SEC Academic Honor Roll since his freshman year. He suffered an ankle injury in the third game of his final season with Tennessee that limited his availability and production for the remainder of the season.

Strengths
  • Prototypical "X" body and frame. By recent draft standards, Tillman is a big receiver. He has the height and length to play on the boundary. There are not a lot of these types available in this year's class or in NFL free agency, so by proxy he has some added value in that regard.

  • Ball skills, catch radius, and body control rival any in class. Tillman pairs fantastic instincts with his length and leaping ability to get himself in position to make any catch. He has tremendous body control and comes down feet inbounds with almost anything he can get his hands on. While he isn’t a burner, he is capable of consistently winning downfield with this trio of skills. He is also good at using his big frame to keep defenders away from the ball. He absorbs contact well at the catch point and maintains ball focus all the way through the process of the catch. He is a true "possession" receiver.

  • Plays with strength and physicality in all phases. Whether at the catch point, his willingness as a run blocker, or his ability to drag defenders for extra yards after the catch, Tillman frequently shows off his play strength and competitiveness. It is a staple of his game. He is a true alpha receiver.

  • Great hands. Tillman has over 10" hands, and it shows up with the way he arrogantly snatches the football. I love the way he greets the ball in the air and prioritizes securing it to his frame immediately. His hands are strong enough to survive heavy contact and late swipes at the ball during the catch process.

Weaknesses
  • Doesn’t win with route running. At this stage, Tillman isn’t really developed in this area. He sort of is a one-speed route runner. Some of that has to do with the Tennessee offense, while most of it can be attributed to a lack of suddenness and ability to explode out of his cuts. If there are physical limitations long-term, there is still plenty of work he can do to improve his tempo and use of fakes to become a better salesman. He also didn’t really have to fight to beat soft-zone looks, as he was basically pinned to the boundary in college and worked mostly a vertical route tree.

  • Doesn't have the top-end gear you hope for in a deep threat. Raw speed is the easiest way to establish yourself as a deep threat, and while Tillman isn’t necessarily slow, I wouldn’t call him fast either. Luckily for him, he has just about every other tool needed to be successful on vertical routes in the NFL.

  • Not much tape of him showing off adequate RAC skills. This is definitely an unknown part of his game, as the nature of what he was asked to do in college simply prevented him from having a ton of RAC opportunities.

Final Points

Tillman profiles as a prototypical "X" receiver with great size, length, and competitiveness. His alpha mentality serves him well. In the NFL, I see him in a role similar to that of Mike Williams or Tee Higgins as a true possession receiver who can be counted on to win along the boundary and consistently move the chains. His ball skills and catch-point prowess basically ensure he is never really covered, even when it appears he is. Considering Tillman’s very specific deficiencies as a player, I do think he is best served as someone who could develop into a team’s #2 receiving option. For me, he scores as a day-2 pick, and I am comfortable with him at the back end of round 2 if the fit is right.

Rashee
Rice
Senior
WR
SMU
Mustangs
SMU Mustangs Logo
Grades
Score Overall
81.5 60
Position Day
11 2
Score Position Day Overall
81.5 11 2 60
Measurables & Drills
Height: 6' Weight: 204 lbs
Hands: 9.5 Arms: 32.75
40 YD Dash: 4.51 10 YD Split: 1.49
Vertical: 41 Broad: 128
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 6' Hands: 9.5 40 YD Dash: 4.51
Weight: 204 lbs Arms: 32.75 10 YD Split: 1.49
Broad: 128 Cone: --
Vertical: 41 Shuttle: --
Height: 6' Hands: 9.5 40 YD Dash: 4.51 Broad: 128 Cone: --
Weight: 204 lbs Arms: 32.75 10 YD Split: 1.49 Vertical: 41 Shuttle: --
The Story

Rice is a promising prospect from the small town of Bullard, Texas. A modestly-touted 3-star recruit out of high school, Rice chose to take his talents to Southern Methodist University, where he had an impressive college football career. In 2022, he earned 1st-team All-AAC honors.

Strengths
  • Exceptional route runner with great ball skills. While the SMU offense limited Rice’s route tree, the routes he was responsible for he ran with extreme precision and dynamic. Rice has flexible ankles, the ability to sink his hips, and the requisite twitch to snap in and out of breaks with ease. He consistently generates good separation, especially on vertical routes. Rice understands how to attack off coverage and how to use tempo to create false steps. He also brings great ball skills to the table, which allow him to maximize his separation. Rice routinely makes necessary adjustments, whether chasing down long balls or working back to underthrows.

  • He WILL out-physical his opponent. Rice is the embodiment of an alpha dog at the receiver position. He wants "all the smoke, all the time" and he will not back down. Whether it's at the catch point or the way he finishes plays with the ball in his hands, he is going to bring it.

  • Complete athletic profile. A well-rounded athlete, Rice is moderately explosive, has good long speed, has lateral quickness, and showcases really good acceleration.

  • Premier RAC skills. Rice adds good vision to his alpha mentality and athletic profile to perform at a very high level with the ball in his hands. He forces missed tackles at an exceptional rate and will also fight to move the chains if wrapped up.

Weaknesses
  • Route tree could be expanded. The SMU Mustangs operate in a very high-tempo spread offense that features lots of short routes and opportunities to play in space downfield. Rice will need to show/develop a more diverse route tree at the next level to see the field consistently.

  • Improvement needed with the "small" details. In the NFL, details matter, especially when building rapport with a quarterback. Rice could stand to get more consistent with some of these details. Specifically, he needs to get better at working into the soft spots of zone looks. There are reps of him doing this on tape, so we know he's capable. Additionally, he can be more consistent on scramble drills working back to his QB.

Final Points

Rice is an excellent receiver prospect with a very well-rounded skill set and fairly limited deficiencies. He profiles for me as a potential #1 receiving option for a team and thus scores as an early Day-2 prospect for me. His blend of athleticism and refined technical abilities should outweigh concerns regarding his smaller-school background.

Jayden
Reed
Senior
WR
Michigan State
Spartans
Michigan State Spartans Logo
Grades
Score Overall
80.7 62
Position Day
12 2
Score Position Day Overall
80.7 12 2 62
Measurables & Drills
Height: 5' 10" Weight: 187 lbs
Hands: 9.13 Arms: 30.5
40 YD Dash: 4.45 10 YD Split: 1.57
Vertical: 33.5 Broad: 121
Shuttle: 4.29 Cone: --
Height: 5' 10" Hands: 9.13 40 YD Dash: 4.45
Weight: 187 lbs Arms: 30.5 10 YD Split: 1.57
Broad: 121 Cone: --
Vertical: 33.5 Shuttle: 4.29
Height: 5' 10" Hands: 9.13 40 YD Dash: 4.45 Broad: 121 Cone: --
Weight: 187 lbs Arms: 30.5 10 YD Split: 1.57 Vertical: 33.5 Shuttle: 4.29
The Story

Hailing from Aurora, Illinois, Reed was a highly-touted high school recruit, earning All-State recognition in both football and track. After a successful freshman campaign at Western Michigan University, Reed transferred to Michigan State, where he established himself as one of the premier pass-catchers in college football. His impressive collegiate career includes multiple All-Conference selections and 1st team All-American honors in 2021, a season in which he racked up 13 total touchdowns.

Strengths
  • Elite quickness is the hallmark of his athletic profile. Reed boasts an impressive athletic profile that is sure to turn heads at the next level. His elite quickness and lateral agility are the cornerstone features of his game. From his route running to his ability after the catch, Reed's twitchy movements are a sight to behold. Additionally, Reed has exceptional burst and acceleration, allowing him to quickly get up to speed. While his top-end speed is good, it may not be considered elite by NFL standards. However, Reed does have requisite speed stack defenders or threaten their leverage and make defenders pay for mistakes.

  • Ridiculous production in contested situations. To say quarterback play and play calling were problematic for Reed throughout his career at Michigan State would be an understatement. As a result, Reed found himself in a lot of contested catch situations where he routinely came up with acrobatic catches fighting through contact to secure the football while flying through the air. Reed should be a big-time asset on back-shoulder balls at the next level and can be trusted in 1-on-1 situations, even if coverage is tight. It’s also worth noting Reed has a ton of experience against press coverage, something most college WRs don’t have the opportunity to produce against.

  • Dangerous in the open field and on designed touches. Reed has fantastic vision in the open field, where he can maximize his burst and quickness to make defenders miss or erode their angles. He should be a designed touch candidate.

  • Perhaps the best return man in the class. Reed is absolutely electric in the return game, where he puts all his physical traits on full display. This a huge value-add for an NFL team looking to get better in multiple facets.

  • Showed improvement and versatility during Senior Bowl week. After playing mostly as an ISO receiver who ran mostly vertical routes in Michigan State’s system, Reed played primarily in the slot during Senior Bowl practices, where he thrived. His route running, specifically on short and intermediate routes, was way more fine-tuned than I initially thought. He won a large majority of his reps, routinely producing separation against the nation's top senior cornerbacks.

Weaknesses
  • Hands technique limits his catch radius. Firstly, Reed measured with just 30.5" arms at the Senior Bowl, which gives him some of the shortest arms in the class. Furthermore, Reed doesn’t make it a point to extend his arms away from his frame to greet the football. Not only does this limit his catch radius, but will also allow DBs to get late hands on the football and knock passes away.

  • Route tree is a question mark. While I noted what he showed during the Senior Bowl practices, we can’t ignore the fact that there are 40+ games of college tape where he just wasn’t really asked to be much more than a vertical threat or screen guy. It doesn't necessarily mean he is limited, we just don’t know for sure.

Final Points

Reed’s vertical skill set, YAC potential, and special teams ability make him a very intriguing prospect for me. While I think he could have a lengthy transition to the NFL, likely learning new positions and alignments (plus an expanded route tree), there is enough to bet on here. I like Reed as a late day-2 prospect, and officially he scores as a mid to late 3rd-round pick for me.

Josh
Downs
Junior
WR
North Carolina
Tar Heels
North Carolina Tar Heels Logo
Grades
Score Overall
80.1 65
Position Day
13 2
Score Position Day Overall
80.1 13 2 65
Measurables & Drills
Height: 5' 9" Weight: 171 lbs
Hands: 9.25 Arms: 30.38
40 YD Dash: 4.48 10 YD Split: 1.49
Vertical: 38.5 Broad: 131
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 5' 9" Hands: 9.25 40 YD Dash: 4.48
Weight: 171 lbs Arms: 30.38 10 YD Split: 1.49
Broad: 131 Cone: --
Vertical: 38.5 Shuttle: --
Height: 5' 9" Hands: 9.25 40 YD Dash: 4.48 Broad: 131 Cone: --
Weight: 171 lbs Arms: 30.38 10 YD Split: 1.49 Vertical: 38.5 Shuttle: --
The Story

Downs, from Suwanee, Georgia, was a highly-touted high school recruit who made a name for himself at North Gwinnett High School, where he earned a 4-star rating. After committing to play for the University of North Carolina, Downs didn’t play much as a freshman but quickly established himself as a key contributor to the Tar Heels' offense as a sophomore, catching over 100 passes. During his football career, he has earned multiple accolades, including 1st team All-ACC in both 2021 and 2022.

Strengths
  • Polished and high-IQ route running. Downs possesses just about every route-running technique/trick in the book. Most notably, he has a tremendous understanding of tempo and how to alter speeds in order to get DBs off balance and create space. He also does a great job using upper body fakes and his acceleration to attack the blind spots and leverage of DBs.

  • Explosive athlete. As mentioned, Downs is a great route runner from a technical standpoint, but he also has the explosiveness in his profile to capitalize on all the space he creates by using sharp cuts in and out of his breaks. He has great speed, which allows him to stack defenders off the line of scrimmage and create false steps at the top of route stems. The explosiveness also pops off the tape when he has the ball in his hands — that is where he did most of his damage at the college level.

  • Ridiculous willingness to sell out his body to make plays. There might not be a more impressive reel of a player completely laying out for a ball or jumping between multiple defenders and willingly taking a shot in order to make a catch. Quite honestly, it's borderline unbelievable considering his size.

  • Very productive in a volume-heavy role. Downs caught nearly 200 balls for 2400 yards and 20 TDs the past two seasons in a low aDOT, high-volume role.

Weaknesses
  • Very small frame. Not only is Downs small, but he is even small for his projected role of undersized slot receiver. It shows up in his play strength as well, as he can really struggle with simple blocking assignments on the weak side.

  • Not a versatile player from an alignment standpoint. Almost all of Downs’ production came when either aligned in the slot or reduced and off the line of scrimmage. Has very few reps winning on the outside.

  • Decently inflated production profile. The problem with projecting these hyper-productive slot-only type receivers from college to the NFL is the number of reps on which they get to be 1-on-1 with disadvantaged defenders. With the frequency of two-high coverage shells being deployed in college, specifically quarters, they often wind up with a two-way go against a safety, where you would expect the receiver to win every time. This is absolutely true for Downs.

Final Points

Downs has a plethora of desirable physical traits as well as refined skills. While there are certainly some downsides and limitations to his game, we have a recent track record of players similar to Downs being drafted very high, and I think, for the most part, NFL teams will look past the negatives in order to add a super dynamic slot weapon to their arsenal. Officially he scores as a firm 2nd-rounder for me and is certainly part of my second tier of WRs in this class.

Nathaniel
Dell
Junior
WR
Houston
Cougars
Houston Cougars Logo
Grades
Score Overall
79.4 68
Position Day
14 2
Score Position Day Overall
79.4 14 2 68
Measurables & Drills
Height: 5' 8" Weight: 165 lbs
Hands: 8.63 Arms: 30.5
40 YD Dash: 4.49 10 YD Split: 1.49
Vertical: -- Broad: 121
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 5' 8" Hands: 8.63 40 YD Dash: 4.49
Weight: 165 lbs Arms: 30.5 10 YD Split: 1.49
Broad: 121 Cone: --
Vertical: -- Shuttle: --
Height: 5' 8" Hands: 8.63 40 YD Dash: 4.49 Broad: 121 Cone: --
Weight: 165 lbs Arms: 30.5 10 YD Split: 1.49 Vertical: -- Shuttle: --
The Story

Nathaniel "Tank" Dell, from Houston, Texas, is a promising prospect with an impressive athletic profile. As a high school recruit, Dell was rated as a 3-star prospect by most recruiting services, but has since made a name for himself at the collegiate level. Dell's college football career started at Alabama A&M. After one season and playing just four games for the Bulldogs, he departed for junior college. After one exceptional season in the junior college ranks, he then transferred home to the Houston Cougars, where he would finish his college career earning 1st team All-AAC in both 2021 and 2022. During that stretch, he amassed a ridiculous 204 receptions for 2,833 yards and 29 TDs. No WR has been more productive over the past two years.

Strengths

Athletic profile is great, including great start-stop ability. Dell is a natural playmaker with the ball in his hands, which is mostly because of his acceleration and incredible lateral quickness. He also features the ability to stop on a dime to then quickly get back to speed. Getting hands on him as a defender has proven to be a very tough task, as he forces an enormous amount of missed tackles. Dell also has very good top speed that can lend to taking a top off a defense if he can get a free release.

Strong at the catch point. On passes downfield, Dell does a good job of using his body to keep defenders away and coming up with the ball in contested situations. This is especially impressive for his size.

Ability as a returner provides plus value. While Dell didn’t get a ton of reps returning kicks or punts in college, the ones we do have are impressive. He can help most teams in this regard.

Weaknesses

Tiny build! Dell weighed just 163 pounds at the Senior Bowl, which is crazy small by NFL standards. In fact, Dell would be an outlier if he winds up having a successful career in the NFL at that weight. Dell is also only 5’8". Injury concerns naturally arise when discussing players that are in outlier territory in terms of size.

Inconsistent hands. Dell has sporadic drop issues. On tape, he has moments where he struggles to greet the ball properly, but he also has a fair share of concentration drops as well. He can sometimes start to run before securing the football.

Limited options with his role. Given his diminutive size, the options for Dell’s role in an offense are pretty scarce. While he did play on the outside a fair amount in college, size limitations will likely prevent that from being an option in the NFL.

Final Points

Dell is a unicorn, in that his talent is abundantly clear, but he presents a unique conflict for teams who have to reconcile his size. While I really like what he has to offer, my scoring system really crushes him for his physical measurements. In the end, he scores as a mid to late day-2 pick for me, and drafting him anywhere in the 3rd round and beyond should be considered a value.

Michael
Wilson
Senior
WR
Stanford
Cardinal
Stanford Cardinal Logo
Grades
Score Overall
78 79
Position Day
15 2
Score Position Day Overall
78 15 2 79
Measurables & Drills
Height: 6' 1 1/2" Weight: 213 lbs
Hands: 9.75 Arms: 31
40 YD Dash: 4.58 10 YD Split: 1.5
Vertical: 37.5 Broad: 125
Shuttle: 4.27 Cone: --
Height: 6' 1 1/2" Hands: 9.75 40 YD Dash: 4.58
Weight: 213 lbs Arms: 31 10 YD Split: 1.5
Broad: 125 Cone: --
Vertical: 37.5 Shuttle: 4.27
Height: 6' 1 1/2" Hands: 9.75 40 YD Dash: 4.58 Broad: 125 Cone: --
Weight: 213 lbs Arms: 31 10 YD Split: 1.5 Vertical: 37.5 Shuttle: 4.27
The Story

Wilson grew up in Simi Valley, California and attended Chaminade College Preparatory School. He was a 4-star recruit coming out of high school and received over 10 FBS offers from mostly Pac-12 schools such as UCLA, California, and Arizona State. He chose to play football at Stanford, where he became a starter and led the team in receiving in his sophomore season. Wilson struggled with injuries in his final three seasons at the college level, never playing in more than six games in a season. However, Wilson was a standout when he was on the field and received numerous accolades. He has been named All-Pac-12 honorable mention twice, first in 2020 and again in 2022. In 2021, Wilson was awarded the Al Masters Award, a prestigious honor given to the Stanford player who best exemplifies the spirit of the team.

Strengths
  • Tall WR with a massive, rocked-up frame. He looks like he's chiseled granite. Wilson has the size and strength to impose his will on defenders.

  • Explosive athletic profile highlighted by elite get-off. When you put on the tape, the first thing that jumps off the screen is how Wilson accelerates. His get-off, especially for a player of his size, is very impressive. He adds good leaping ability to the mix as well, which was confirmed by his Combine testing. He does lack the top gear to run away from cornerbacks downfield, however.

  • Arguably the best route runner in the class. At worst, he is the best big-bodied route runner in the class. Wilson combines his explosiveness with crisp, detailed breaks. He has the flexibility to sink his hips and accelerate through those breaks, generating easy separation on short and intermediate routes. His suddenness is special. Wilson also does a good job altering tempo and using his frame to keep defenders off balance. When he leans on DBs, they feel it.

  • Bonafide run-after-catch threat. Wilson has good contact balance to match with explosive cutting ability, and with his size, he is a load to bring down. Any time he gets the ball in space, he is a threat to make things happen.

  • Exceptional ball skills with a go-up-and-get-it mentality. Overall, he has a very enticing skill set at the catch point. Wilson is strong at high-pointing the ball and timing his jumps well. Has a good amount of big-time wins at the catch point, sometimes in double coverage. Again, he is a very powerful receiver who is hard to handle, especially for smaller corners.

Weaknesses
  • Big-time production concerns stemming from extensive injury history. Wilson hasn’t even played a full season over the past two years and, thus, hasn’t really produced much. He is a big projection, and I am hinging a lot of my evaluation on what I saw at the Senior Bowl.

  • Drop issues are concerning. For a guy who profiles as a volume, possession-type receiver, he doesn’t have the cleanest catching mechanics. Sometimes he misjudges the ball's flight and is late getting his hands up to greet the football. Other times, he will just have lapses in concentration, usually when looking to get upfield in a hurry.

  • Lacks a top gear to be a consistent winner downfield. Wilson might be able to produce on deep targets at the next level, but it won’t be because he ran past anyone. He will have to win with his size and route running, and will need a quarterback willing to get him the ball in tight spaces.

Final Points

Wilson’s general lack of time on the field makes him a massive question mark in this Draft class. Opinions on him are going to be all over the place, and depending on the team, many might not even have him on their board because of injuries. With that said, I am willing to bet on the physical traits and developed skills here. There is a lot to work with. Wilson best profiles as a high-volume possession-type receiver who dominates the short and intermediate parts of the field. I even like the idea of possibly turning him into a big slot receiver to try and get favorable matchups for him. When I watch him, stylistically, I see a skill set that blends Tee Higgins and Pierre Garcon’s game. Wilson scores as a day-2 prospect for whom I am most comfortable drafting in the 3rd round.

Puka
Nacua
Junior
WR
BYU
Cougars
BYU Cougars Logo
Grades
Score Overall
77.4 82
Position Day
16 2
Score Position Day Overall
77.4 16 2 82
Measurables & Drills
Height: 6' 1 1/2" Weight: 201 lbs
Hands: 9.5 Arms: 31.5
40 YD Dash: -- 10 YD Split: --
Vertical: -- Broad: --
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 6' 1 1/2" Hands: 9.5 40 YD Dash: --
Weight: 201 lbs Arms: 31.5 10 YD Split: --
Broad: -- Cone: --
Vertical: -- Shuttle: --
Height: 6' 1 1/2" Hands: 9.5 40 YD Dash: -- Broad: -- Cone: --
Weight: 201 lbs Arms: 31.5 10 YD Split: -- Vertical: -- Shuttle: --
The Story

As a high-school recruit from Orem, Utah, Nacua was ranked as a four-star prospect and the No. 2 player in Utah by 247Sports. After lackluster freshman and sophomore seasons at the University of Washington, Nacua transferred to Brigham Young University in hopes of seeing the field more. Nacua would go on to start 21 games for the Cougars, for whom he averaged over 85 total yards a game and racked up 16 touchdowns.

Strengths

Plays above the rim with exceptional body control. Nacua has a great frame for a WR, with good length and a rock-solid build at nearly 210 pounds. He adds incredible ball skills and body control to the mix to make him a legitimate downfield threat who can consistently win at the catch point. When I watch Nacua, I see glimpses of Justin Jefferson and his ability to own the boundary, whether downfield or the intermediate parts of the field.

Exceptional lateral ability. Nacua’s lateral agility and ability to make quick, demonstrative cuts is all over his tape.

Manufactured touches are a must. Nacua was insanely productive in the screen/trick game. He has the ability to make guys miss in the open field and has really nice contact balance that allows him to be a menace for those that get their hands on him.

Competitive toughness that makes you blush. All of his plus traits lead to this overarching theme — Nacua plays every snap like it's his last. He blocks his butt off, he is physical in his routes and at the catch point, and he doesn’t allow himself to be tackled without putting up an insane fight. He wants all the smoke and routinely delivers.

Weaknesses

Not a separator.. yet. As of right now his route running is underdeveloped. While Nacua absolutely has the physical traits to become a good route runner, it's just not there yet, and he really struggles to consistently generate separation against man coverage. He also doesn’t really have much of a release game to speak of, which is evident by his lack of production against teams that like to press.

Lacks top-shelf explosiveness. Nacua likely isn’t going to be a guy who wins with long-speed or explosiveness. This likely puts a ceiling on his vertical receiving ability at the NFL level.

Final Points

Nacua has several desirable traits that translate well to the NFL game, but his deficiencies are definitely worth being a little skittish about. I like Nacua as a good developmental prospect who can offer a team boundary reps and YAC ability in Year One. He scores as a fringe Day-2 to early Day-3 prospect for me.

Charlie
Jones
Senior
WR
Purdue
Boilermakers
Purdue Boilermakers Logo
Grades
Score Overall
76.9 87
Position Day
17 2
Score Position Day Overall
76.9 17 2 87
Measurables & Drills
Height: 5' 11" Weight: 175 lbs
Hands: 9 Arms: 31.63
40 YD Dash: 4.43 10 YD Split: 1.51
Vertical: 36.5 Broad: 124
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 5' 11" Hands: 9 40 YD Dash: 4.43
Weight: 175 lbs Arms: 31.63 10 YD Split: 1.51
Broad: 124 Cone: --
Vertical: 36.5 Shuttle: --
Height: 5' 11" Hands: 9 40 YD Dash: 4.43 Broad: 124 Cone: --
Weight: 175 lbs Arms: 31.63 10 YD Split: 1.51 Vertical: 36.5 Shuttle: --
The Story

Jones grew up in Deerfield, Illinois. where he attended Deerfield High School. He was a two-star recruit coming out of high school and only received one FBS offer from the University of Buffalo. After one season where he caught 18 passes for 395 yards and three touchdowns, he transferred to Iowa, where he made a name for himself as one of the best return specialists in the Big Ten. He was named First-Team All-Big Ten return specialist in 2021 and Second-Team All-Big Ten return specialist in 2020 by the league coaches. In 2022, he transferred to Purdue to continue his football career. He set the school record for receiving yards with 1,361 in a season. He also was a semifinalist for the Biletnikoff Award in 2022.

Strengths
  • Good long speed and easy accelerator. Jones’ best athletic trait is his ability to accelerate quickly. It looks effortless. He pairs that burst with the ability to decelerate and stop on a dime as well. This also points to really good body control and lower half flexibility. In terms of long speed, I think Jones measures somewhere along the lines of "enough." While he isn’t going to straight-up run by faster CBs in the NFL, he definitely has enough juice to maintain separation after a route win and can punish slower defenders.

  • Route running specialist. Easily one of the better route runners in the class. He has the hip sink and flexible ankles to snap off routes or make insanely crisp cuts. He runs routes with precision and attention to detail, and mixes in a heavy diet of feints and leans to keep defenders off balance. He could teach a masterclass on how to use tempo changes to set up defenders and maximize his elite acceleration. I would put him right up there with Jordan Addison in terms of his ability to use double moves. When attacking soft-zone looks, if there is space to find, Jones will find it.

  • Ridiculous ball skills and deep tracking ability. This is probably the most surprising thing when I put on his tape, and you definitely see more of it his last year at Iowa than his brief stint at Purdue. Jones tracks the ball like a baseball center fielder and is capable of chasing deep balls down and catching over his shoulder or completely laying out for the football to make the catch. While I don’t necessarily see Jones being a jump ball/contested catch guy in the NFL, he does an exceptional job using his body to wall off defenders, absorbing contact, and maintaining focus at the catch point. Really safe to target over the middle of the field.

  • Plus value as a punt/kick returner. Jones has a ton of experience returning punts and kicks in college and has a couple of return touchdowns to go with good return production.

Weaknesses
  • Not a big RAC threat. For a guy who caught 110 passes this past season, it's incredibly odd that you can probably count the amount of missed tackles he forced on one or two hands. We are talking Chris Olave levels of elusiveness, which is not the side of the spectrum you want to be on.

  • Inconsistent getting off press. Jones could do a better job of synchronizing his hands and feet and implementing some of that suddeness you see in his route running to help him get off press. His best press-beating reps happened on a small sample while at Iowa.

  • Limited catch radius. With sub 32" arms and non-elite leaping ability, his catch radius does have physical limitations. It is worth pointing out, however, that Jones mitigates to some degree with his ball skills.

  • One-hit wonder. While his one hit happens to be one of the best receiving seasons in Big-10 history, it is concerning that it took until his 6th season at the college level for him to really take off.

  • Ancient for a prospect. Jones is 24 years old during the draft process and will turn 25 semi-early into his rookie season.

Final Points

Jones profiles as a versatile receiver who can play both inside and out and has sneaky upside as a deep threat. His route running is some of the best in class, and should help with a quick transition to the NFL game. At his projected ceiling, his likely best role is as a high-end WR3 for a solid passing offense that values versatility. Jones’ profile isn’t all rainbows and butterflies, though. as there are concerns centered around his production profile and age as a rookie. He scores as a late day-2 player for me and ranks comfortably inside the top 20 at his position.

Trey
Palmer
Junior
WR
Nebraska
Cornhuskers
Nebraska Cornhuskers Logo
Grades
Score Overall
74.8 108
Position Day
18 3
Score Position Day Overall
74.8 18 3 108
Measurables & Drills
Height: 6' Weight: 192 lbs
Hands: 9.63 Arms: 31.88
40 YD Dash: 4.33 10 YD Split: 1.51
Vertical: -- Broad: --
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 6' Hands: 9.63 40 YD Dash: 4.33
Weight: 192 lbs Arms: 31.88 10 YD Split: 1.51
Broad: -- Cone: --
Vertical: -- Shuttle: --
Height: 6' Hands: 9.63 40 YD Dash: 4.33 Broad: -- Cone: --
Weight: 192 lbs Arms: 31.88 10 YD Split: 1.51 Vertical: -- Shuttle: --
The Story

Trey Palmer is from Kentwood, Louisiana and attended Kentwood High School. He left high school as a 4-star recruit and received offers from schools such as Georgia, Alabama, and Texas. He chose to attend LSU, but decided to transfer to the University of Nebraska after struggling to earn significant playing time. After transferring from LSU, Palmer quickly made his presence known on the field. He set a Nebraska record with 1,043 receiving yards during the 2022 season and was named to the Third-Team All-Big Ten.

Strengths
  • Legit deep speed. Possibly the fastest WR in the class with both GPS and 40-yard dash confirmation.

  • Good ball skills highlighted by the ability to play above the rim and high point the ball.

  • Has translatable skills as a route runner. Understands how to mix up the tempo to keep defenders off balance and maximize his speed.

Weaknesses
  • Very raw prospect. Wins almost exclusively with his athleticism. This could be viewed as a positive by some.

  • Poor hands. Loses focus at times, especially over the middle of the field or in congested areas.

  • Doesn’t run every route with the same intent.

Final Points

Palmer is a "bet on the traits" developmental speedster who one could argue has a ton of untapped potential. He has unteachable track speed and explosiveness that sets him apart from a congested group of wide receivers. However, he is raw in just about every aspect and will need to put in some serious work to reach his ceiling. His ideal fit is with a team that has a strong, already established WR room. Teams in need of an added deep component that missed out on Jalin Hyatt or Tyler Scott should also be interested. He scores as a fringe late day-2 to early day-3 player. I am most comfortable with him in the 4th round, but I can be sold on his traits being worth a 3rd.

Xavier
Hutchinson
Senior
WR
Iowa State
Cyclones
Iowa State Cyclones Logo
Grades
Score Overall
74.2 113
Position Day
19 3
Score Position Day Overall
74.2 19 3 113
Measurables & Drills
Height: 6' 1 6/8" Weight: 203 lbs
Hands: 9.38 Arms: 31.38
40 YD Dash: 4.53 10 YD Split: 1.55
Vertical: 36 Broad: 116
Shuttle: 4.35 Cone: 6.91
Height: 6' 1 6/8" Hands: 9.38 40 YD Dash: 4.53
Weight: 203 lbs Arms: 31.38 10 YD Split: 1.55
Broad: 116 Cone: 6.91
Vertical: 36 Shuttle: 4.35
Height: 6' 1 6/8" Hands: 9.38 40 YD Dash: 4.53 Broad: 116 Cone: 6.91
Weight: 203 lbs Arms: 31.38 10 YD Split: 1.55 Vertical: 36 Shuttle: 4.35
The Story

Hutchinson, a standout wide receiver from Jacksonville, Florida, made a name for himself in college football after being recruited as a 3-star athlete. He had an impressive career at Iowa State University, becoming a key player for the Cyclones. In his senior year, he was named a finalist for the Biletnikoff Award and earned 1st-team All-American honors. Hutchinson was a consistent performer throughout his college career, earning 1st team All-Big 12 honors three times in a row (2020, 2021, 2022).

Strengths
  • Great size and length profile. Hutchinson has an old-school prototypical size profile that gives him a good catch radius and ability to line up anywhere.

  • Developed skills as a route runner and high route running IQ. Hutchinson demonstrates a good understanding of pace and leverage while also routinely putting his best athletic attribute on display — his ability to make definitive cuts.

  • Excellent body control and contested catch ability. Hutchinson’s length and ultra-competitive nature pair well with his ability to control his body to be formidable at the catch point. He uses his body well and attacks the football with intensity.

  • Might have the best hands in the class. Hutchinson had only 9 drops on 279 targets over the past two seasons. Hutchinson has big, strong hands and greets the football well.

  • Three years of production at the Power-5 level. Hutchinson has nearly 3,000 yards receiving over the past three seasons and over 250 receptions.

Weaknesses
  • No explosiveness to his game whatsoever. Athletic limitations really cap what he will be able to do at the next level. He won’t be a downfield threat at the NFL level and is likely destined for a possession-type role with limited upside.

  • Doesn’t offer a YAC element. While Hutchinson certainly has a competitive nature where he fights for extra yards and to move the chains, he is not dynamic in this regard whatsoever.

  • Older prospect. Hutchinson will be a 23-year-old rookie.

Final Points

Ultimately Hutchinson doesn’t have that one trait to set him apart from others, but he should be considered a solid WR prospect who could possibly develop into a starter within a few years. Officially, he scored as an early Day-3 prospect for me.

Andrei
Iosivas
Senior
WR
Princeton
Tigers
Princeton Tigers Logo
Grades
Score Overall
74 117
Position Day
20 3
Score Position Day Overall
74 20 3 117
Measurables & Drills
Height: 6' 3" Weight: 205 lbs
Hands: 8.75 Arms: 32
40 YD Dash: 4.43 10 YD Split: 1.52
Vertical: 39 Broad: 128
Shuttle: 4.12 Cone: 6.85
Height: 6' 3" Hands: 8.75 40 YD Dash: 4.43
Weight: 205 lbs Arms: 32 10 YD Split: 1.52
Broad: 128 Cone: 6.85
Vertical: 39 Shuttle: 4.12
Height: 6' 3" Hands: 8.75 40 YD Dash: 4.43 Broad: 128 Cone: 6.85
Weight: 205 lbs Arms: 32 10 YD Split: 1.52 Vertical: 39 Shuttle: 4.12
The Story

Iosivas grew up in Honolulu, Hawaii and went to the Punahou School for high school. He ran track in addition to playing football in high school and went to Princeton to do the same. As a track athlete at Princeton, Iosivas was a 2022 NCAA All-American in the heptathlon, and a three-time heptathlon champion in 2019, 2020, and 2022. He ran the fastest ever 60m in the NCAA heptathlon at the 2022 NCAA Indoor Championships. Iosivas started his collegiate football career on Princeton’s junior varsity team before joining the varsity team in his sophomore year. Iosivas made a name for himself on the football field, receiving numerous accolades, including being named a Phil Steele Ivy Offensive Player of the Year and First-Team All-Ivy in 2022, as well as earning an Associated Press Second-Team All-America selection. He was also named to the Second-Team All-Ivy in 2021.

Strengths
  • Phenomenal athlete with elite top gear and explosiveness.

  • Vertical receiving skill set. Threatens the outside shoulder of CBs well and can force false steps at the break point.

  • Can be a RAC threat when catching the ball in space.

Weaknesses
  • Not currently a three-level route runner. Runs a limited route tree.

  • Allows defensive backs to play through his frame at the catch point. General lack of physicality in all phases.

  • Doesn’t greet the football with his hands extended and lets it into his body.

  • Modest production despite poor level of competition.

Final Points

Iosivas profiles as a developmental wide receiver with deep-threat ability. His elite physical traits give him an attractive starting point to work with. While he has many undeveloped aspects of his game, he should contribute early as an opportunistic deep threat, and his game reminds me a bit of DJ Chark. For me, he scores as an early day-3 prospect worthy of a 4th or 5th-round pick.

Kayshon
Boutte
Junior
WR
LSU
Tigers
LSU Tigers Logo
Grades
Score Overall
73.8 122
Position Day
21 3
Score Position Day Overall
73.8 21 3 122
Measurables & Drills
Height: 5' 11" Weight: 195 lbs
Hands: 9.5 Arms: 31.38
40 YD Dash: 4.5 10 YD Split: 1.58
Vertical: 29 Broad: 118
Shuttle: 4.25 Cone: --
Height: 5' 11" Hands: 9.5 40 YD Dash: 4.5
Weight: 195 lbs Arms: 31.38 10 YD Split: 1.58
Broad: 118 Cone: --
Vertical: 29 Shuttle: 4.25
Height: 5' 11" Hands: 9.5 40 YD Dash: 4.5 Broad: 118 Cone: --
Weight: 195 lbs Arms: 31.38 10 YD Split: 1.58 Vertical: 29 Shuttle: 4.25
The Story

Boutte grew up in New Iberia, Louisiana. He attended Westgate High School, where he was a standout football player. He was a five-star receiver coming out of high school and the number three receiver prospect in the nation. He received offers from SEC schools such as Alabama and Tennessee, but chose to commit to LSU. With LSU teammate opting out of the 2020 season, Boutte immediately became an impact player in his freshman year. He was named a Freshman All-American by the Football Writers Association of America and a Freshman All-SEC selection. He struggled to take the next step following his freshman season due to an injury his sophomore year, and he recorded only 538 receiving yards in his junior season.

Strengths
  • RAC specialist. Generates chunk plays on simple touches underneath.

  • Excels with vertical stems. Has the ball skills to pair.

  • Versatile from an alignment standpoint, can play inside or out.

Weaknesses
  • Recent tape shows a lack of explosiveness. Combine confirmed as much.

  • No polish to his route running and isn’t detailed enough. Not a natural separator.

  • Limited catch radius and inconsistent hands. Doesn’t greet the football away from his frame cleanly.

  • Injury concerns, two major surgeries on the same ankle.

Final Points

Boutte is a very hard player to evaluate, considering the back-to-back surgeries on his ankle. The player you see pre-surgeries is significantly different from the player you see post-surgeries, and it’s concerning that his subpar Combine confirmed what you see on his 2022 tape. I do not have the medical expertise to assess whether he will ever return to his old form. With that said, my valuation of him is strictly based on his most recent tape.

Boutte profiles initially as a rotational wide receiver with upside as a catch-and-run player. As he develops his route running ability, I see him earning starter reps in the slot with the versatility to play outside if needed. His athletic limitations and lagging skills are clear obstacles in the way of him becoming a high-upside player. Perhaps a team should take a chance they’ll find the Boutte of 2021, but for me, he scores as a mid day-3 pick.

Ronnie
Bell
Senior
WR
Michigan
Wolverines
Michigan Wolverines Logo
Grades
Score Overall
72.9 132
Position Day
22 3
Score Position Day Overall
72.9 22 3 132
Measurables & Drills
Height: 5' 11 1/2" Weight: 191 lbs
Hands: 9.5 Arms: 31
40 YD Dash: 4.54 10 YD Split: 1.52
Vertical: 38.5 Broad: 120
Shuttle: 4.15 Cone: 6.98
Height: 5' 11 1/2" Hands: 9.5 40 YD Dash: 4.54
Weight: 191 lbs Arms: 31 10 YD Split: 1.52
Broad: 120 Cone: 6.98
Vertical: 38.5 Shuttle: 4.15
Height: 5' 11 1/2" Hands: 9.5 40 YD Dash: 4.54 Broad: 120 Cone: 6.98
Weight: 191 lbs Arms: 31 10 YD Split: 1.52 Vertical: 38.5 Shuttle: 4.15
The Story

Bell grew up in Kansas City, Missouri and attended Park Hill High School, where he played both basketball and football. He was a 3-star football recruit coming out of high school, but initially did not receive any Division I FBS offers. He committed to play basketball at Missouri State due to the lack of D1 offers, but the University of Michigan stepped in late to make him an offer. He took back his basketball commitment and decided to join the Wolverines to play football. Bell was a two-time All-Big Ten honoree, earning third-team honors in 2022 and honorable mention in 2019. He was also the Wolverines Rookie of the Year in 2018 for a season in which he had eight receptions for 145 yards and two touchdowns.

Strengths
  • High-level intangibles: competitiveness, IQ, and intensity.

  • Willing and productive run blocker. Locates and sticks to his target well.

  • Above-average route runner, especially against zone looks.

  • Can be slippery after the catch. Some potential gadget use upside.

Weaknesses
  • Not a consistent man-coverage beater.

  • Lacks the release package and play strength to consistently beat press.

  • Horrendous production in contested situations. Routinely gets outmuscled and allows DBs to play through his hands.

Final Points

Bell profiles as a low-ceiling receiver who has very specific needs in development before he earns playing time at the NFL level. He will be best suited playing off the line of scrimmage, ideally in the slot where he can get free releases and can work into space against zone coverages. He brings a little manufactured touch upside to the table as well. He scores as a day-3 player for me who should be considered after the 4th round.

Parker
Washington
Sophomore
WR
Penn State
Nittany Lions
Penn State Nittany Lions Logo
Grades
Score Overall
72.9 132
Position Day
22 3
Score Position Day Overall
72.9 22 3 132
Measurables & Drills
Height: 5' 9 1/2" Weight: 204 lbs
Hands: 10.13 Arms: 29
40 YD Dash: -- 10 YD Split: --
Vertical: -- Broad: --
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 5' 9 1/2" Hands: 10.13 40 YD Dash: --
Weight: 204 lbs Arms: 29 10 YD Split: --
Broad: -- Cone: --
Vertical: -- Shuttle: --
Height: 5' 9 1/2" Hands: 10.13 40 YD Dash: -- Broad: -- Cone: --
Weight: 204 lbs Arms: 29 10 YD Split: -- Vertical: -- Shuttle: --
The Story

Washington, from Richmond, Texas, was a highly sought-after 4-star recruit coming out of high school. Washington immediately turned heads at Penn State as he became the first true freshman receiver to start a game for the Nittany Lions in over five years. Washington started all nine games that season and averaged over 50 yards a game and notched six TDs. He went on to have moderately productive sophomore and junior seasons before entering the NFL draft as a 20-year-old.

Strengths
  • Excellent with the ball in his hands. Washington has one of the most unorthodox builds you will see at the WR position, being under 6 foot tall and weighing over 210 pounds. He looks like a running back with massive, well developed thighs that give him the power to run right through tackle attempts, akin to Deebo Samuel in a lot of ways. He also has the burst to erode defender angles and the lateral quickness to make guys miss with jukes and a variety of jump cuts.

  • Contested catch artist with great ball skills. Washington tracks balls in the air with precision, even on flatter high-velocity throws. If he can get anywhere near the ball he will figure out a way to make the catch. He has a lengthy reel of ridiculous catches consisting of toe taps, layouts, one-handed grabs, and going airborne while absorbing massive contact.

  • Ridiculously good hands. Washington has big, strong hands and a great approach to catching the football. He maximizes his length with good extension away from his body and urgently tucks the ball away tight to his chest. He doesn’t drop anything.

Weaknesses
  • Just an average route runner, needs to improve. Washington has almost zero nuance to his route running. Mostly aligning in the slot, he thrived with constantly getting free releases and basically never had to face press. Almost all of his production came on crossing routes, screens, or straight go balls against zone.

  • Was never really "the guy" at Penn State. With Jahan Dotson leaving for the NFL after 2021, Washington finally had a chance to establish himself as the alpha of the room and it just never really materialized. This, with modest production overall, really puts in question what his ceiling truly is as a player.

Final Points

In a super deep class of WRs, Washington kind of just gets lost in the shuffle as a guy with some plus traits but nothing really to set him apart from the crowd. There are some things to like here, though, and he does have some added value as a dynamic return man on special teams. In the end, he scores as an early Day-3 prospect for me.

Derius
Davis
Senior
WR
TCU
Horned Frogs
TCU Horned Frogs Logo
Grades
Score Overall
70.5 150
Position Day
24 3
Score Position Day Overall
70.5 24 3 150
Measurables & Drills
Height: 5' 8" Weight: 165 lbs
Hands: 8 Arms: 29.25
40 YD Dash: 4.36 10 YD Split: 1.46
Vertical: -- Broad: --
Shuttle: 4.38 Cone: --
Height: 5' 8" Hands: 8 40 YD Dash: 4.36
Weight: 165 lbs Arms: 29.25 10 YD Split: 1.46
Broad: -- Cone: --
Vertical: -- Shuttle: 4.38
Height: 5' 8" Hands: 8 40 YD Dash: 4.36 Broad: -- Cone: --
Weight: 165 lbs Arms: 29.25 10 YD Split: 1.46 Vertical: -- Shuttle: 4.38
The Story

Davis hails from St. Francisville, Louisiana, where he attended West Feliciana High School. Along with playing football, he also ran track and won the 200-meter dash at the state meet in his senior year. He was a three-star recruit coming out of high school and committed to play football at TCU. In his college football career, Davis made a name for himself as a dynamic playmaker on special teams, as well as a reliable target for his quarterbacks. He has racked up an impressive list of accolades, including the 2022 Jet Award, which recognizes the top return specialist in college football, and the 2022 Big 12 Special Teams Player of the Year award. In addition, Davis was named a First-Team All-American as a punt returner and a First-Team All-Big 12 selection for his work on kick and punt returns. He also received honorable mention All-Big 12 recognition in 2020 for his special teams contributions.

Strengths
  • Springy athlete with easy acceleration and good long speed.

  • Light on his feet, capable of making quick, sharp cuts running routes or with the ball in his hands.

  • Elusive enough to warrant a gadget package designed for him.

  • Excellent special teams value as a returner.

Weaknesses
  • Tiny frame with poor length. Play strength issues and limited catch radius come as a result.

  • Not a developed route runner and limited reps consistently sitting his routes down against zone.

  • Most of his production came on gadget plays or shallow crossers in space.

  • General lack of production at the college level.

Final Points

Davis is yet another diminutive receiver prospect who translates best in a predominant slot receiver role at the next level — this class is full of these guys. Davis brings plus athleticism to the table but currently lacks the skill set to get onto an NFL field as a route runner. The tools to improve in this area are there, however. The big value of Davis is what he will bring on special teams as a returner — he would instantly make many teams better in this aspect. Davis profiles as a back-end roster or practice squad candidate as a developmental slot receiver who provides special teams ability. He scores as a mid-day-3 pick for me.

Justin
Shorter
Junior
WR
Florida
Gators
Florida Gators Logo
Grades
Score Overall
67.7 165
Position Day
25 3
Score Position Day Overall
67.7 25 3 165
Measurables & Drills
Height: 6' 3" Weight: 229 lbs
Hands: 10 Arms: 33.75
40 YD Dash: 4.55 10 YD Split: 1.59
Vertical: 35.5 Broad: 126
Shuttle: -- Cone: --
Height: 6' 3" Hands: 10 40 YD Dash: 4.55
Weight: 229 lbs Arms: 33.75 10 YD Split: 1.59
Broad: 126 Cone: --
Vertical: 35.5 Shuttle: --
Height: 6' 3" Hands: 10 40 YD Dash: 4.55 Broad: 126 Cone: --
Weight: 229 lbs Arms: 33.75 10 YD Split: 1.59 Vertical: 35.5 Shuttle: --
The Story

Shorter hails from Monmouth Junction, New Jersey. He attended South Brunswick High School, where he earned the title of USA Today's All-USA New Jersey Offensive Player of the Year in 2017. Shorter was a highly sought-after 5-star recruit, ranked as the No. 7 overall prospect, No. 1 player in New Jersey, and No. 1 wide receiver by 247Sports. He received offers from numerous FBS schools, such as Michigan, Tennessee, and Miami. He committed to Penn State, but after an injury-plagued freshman season, he transferred to the University of Florida, where he played from 2019-2022. He finished his career at Florida with 95 catches and 1,395 yards in 32 games, and also was on the academic honor roll from 2020 to 2022.

Strengths
  • Massive-framed prototype "X" receiver. From a size, length, and athleticism perspective, Shorter is the old-school possession receiver type who thrives out on the boundary. He plays with insane physicality and has the size and strength to fight off defensive backs in the air.

  • Big-time ball-winner. Shorter is one of the best contested-catch receivers in this Draft. He has good ball skills and plays with an alpha mentality when the ball is up for grabs.

  • Surprising foot speed. While I wouldn’t call Shorter "quick," he does have enough quickness to pair with his size to win routes in the short and intermediate parts of the field. I especially liked his ability to decelerate and work back to the QB.

Weaknesses
  • His overall lack of production needs explaining. To me, it's a complete mystery why Shorter wasn’t more productive in college, and that’s a red flag. He is a pretty talented player and had favorable situations at both PSU and Florida.

  • Lack of acceleration caps his ability to generate separation. Sometimes Shorter looks like a semi-truck getting out of his stance. His long speed is decent, but it is definitely of the "build-up" variety. This puts a lower ceiling on his ability to separate. He will need a QB willing to trust him in tight coverage and/or tightly confined spaces.

Final Points

Shorter profiles as a possession receiver who does most of his work on the outside. With that said, I would like to see a team try to incorporate looks featuring him as a big slot, dimilar to the way Juwan Johnson is used in New Orleans or the way Jauan Jennings is used in San Francisco. The upside with Shorter vs. those two is his ability on contested catches. While there are clear deficiencies to Shorter’s game, I do see enough workable traits/skills to warrant a draft selection. Early in his career, he is best suited as a role-specific bench receiver who will need to learn to play special teams in order to secure his roster spot. He scores as a mid-day-3 player for me, and I like him better than others who fit a similar archetype, like Bryce Ford-Wheaton.

Bryce
Ford-Wheaton
Junior
WR
West Virginia
Mountaineers
West Virginia Mountaineers Logo
Grades
Score Overall
64 173
Position Day
26 3
Score Position Day Overall
64 26 3 173
Measurables & Drills
Height: 6' 4" Weight: 221 lbs
Hands: 9.375 Arms: 33.5
40 YD Dash: 4.38 10 YD Split: 1.54
Vertical: 41 Broad: 129
Shuttle: 4.15 Cone: 6.97
Height: 6' 4" Hands: 9.375 40 YD Dash: 4.38
Weight: 221 lbs Arms: 33.5 10 YD Split: 1.54
Broad: 129 Cone: 6.97
Vertical: 41 Shuttle: 4.15
Height: 6' 4" Hands: 9.375 40 YD Dash: 4.38 Broad: 129 Cone: 6.97
Weight: 221 lbs Arms: 33.5 10 YD Split: 1.54 Vertical: 41 Shuttle: 4.15
The Story

Ford-Wheaton is from Holly Springs, North Carolina and attended Holly Springs High School, where he played football and ran track. He was a 3-star recruit coming out of high school and chose to commit to West Virginia to play football, where his grandfather was a longtime athletics administrator. Ford-Wheaton's notable accolades include being named to the All-Big 12 Conference Second Team in 2022 and earning All-Big 12 Honorable Mention in 2021.

Strengths
  • Ridiculous athlete, confirmed by the Combine. On paper, Ford-Wheaton tested so well that he is in the conversation of most athletic WR of all time.

  • Vertical receiving threat. Ford-Wheaton’s skill set features deep speed, ball skills, and contested catch ability. Ford-Wheaton isn’t the ideal deep-threat archetype, but he gets it done by being physical at the catch point and using his size to box defenders out. He also uses his massive catch radius to get his hands on the ball.

Weaknesses
  • Limited route running prowess. For how juiced up Ford-Wheaton is, you would assume he has some ability to separate, but it really doesn’t show. He rounds many of his routes at the break and isn’t able to accelerate or explode through them. An evident lack of flexibility in the ankle and hips is a contributing factor. To make matters worse, he ran a very limited route tree in college.

  • Inconsistent hands. There are random drops all over his tape. Sometimes he loses focus. When he greets the football cleanly with extended arms, he shows strong hands and the ability to secure the ball to his frame. But, the lapses were plaguing at times.

  • One-trick pony. At this point in time, he is best used as a contested-catch player downfield who lines up on the outside. He offers almost no positional versatility.

Final Points

Ford-Wheaton has the physical traits to make anyone salivate. It’s difficult to put into words, though, how much of a project he is. Currently, he has very few developed skills as a receiver. While it's hard to pass on the developmental upside he brings to the table, my valuation for him would be as a mid to late-day-3 pick.